Atlas of Clinical and Surgical Orbital Anatomy

Atlas of Clinical and Surgical Orbital Anatomy

BOOK REVIEWS EDITED BY MARK J. MANNIS, M.D. • Atlas of Clinical and Surgical Orbital Anatomy. By Jonathan J. Dutton. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, W.B...

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BOOK REVIEWS EDITED BY MARK J. MANNIS, M.D.

• Atlas of Clinical and Surgical Orbital Anatomy. By Jonathan J. Dutton. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, W.B. Saunders, 1994. 240 pages, index, illustrated. $150 REVIEWED BY GEORGE B. BARTLEY

Rochester, Minnesota

W

HEN CONFRONTED WITH YET ANOTHER ANATO-

my text, a reader who is familiar with extant descriptions may wonder what more can be said. This atlas, however, demonstrates that new perspectives on structure and function are necessary and worthy of careful study. The book offers DITTOX much more than the title · might suggest. First, unlike some atlas­ es, it is not simply a collection of drawings I and and photographs. Al­ © ' 3 Surgical though the illustrations t ' ^ · Orbital <\..u:.„i are clear and attractive, Anatomy it is the accompanying well-referenced text, Th«US IK « l U n i p which lucidly describes HI pertinent embryologie, anatomic, and clinical correlates, that is particularly useful. Second, the book's scope is not limited to the orbit proper, but also includes the eyelids and the lacrimal secretory and drainage structures. Third, the title could be expanded to include orbital and adnexal histology as well as anatomy. Of the book's ten chapters, the first eight, which describe the orbital bones, extraocular muscles, nerves, arterial supply, venous drainage, connective tissue, eyelids and anterior orbit, and lacrimal systems, are similar to other atlases. Gross structures are

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displayed in the frontal, lateral, and superior planes. Cross-sections are clearly represented and under­ standable. The artwork is detailed, but not "busy." The final two chapters constitute approximately one third of the book and are its most impressive features. Chapter 9 demonstrates comprehensively the histologie anatomy of the orbit. The 100figuresin the chapter were selected from 300 celloidin block sections of 150 μηι thickness. The orientations of many of the sections are unusual or unique and will be of interest to serious students of orbital anatomy. Chapter 10, "Radiographie Correlations," includes 12 figures to display normal orbital anatomy in the axial and coronal planes. Each figure consists of four parts: a lateral drawing to indicate the plane of section, an artist's illustration of the section, and corresponding computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging sections. It is a minor inconven­ ience that the text for each figure is separate from the illustrations, but this arrangement was probably un­ avoidable for space and printing reasons. From medical students performing theirfirstorbital dissection to experienced surgeons who venture into this compact but complex region, this excellent atlas has much to offer.

• Color Atlas of Ophthalmic Surgery. Retinal Surgery and Ocular Trauma. Edited by Kenneth W. Wright. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, J. B. Lippincott, 1995. 244 pages, index, illustrated. $99.50 REVIEWED BY JAMES T. HANDA

Sacramento, California

T

HE AUTHORS OF THIS BOOK SET OUT TO PROVIDE AN

atlas on common vitreoretinal problems as a primer for ophthalmologists whose practices are not

BOOK REVIEWS

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