Average abundances of Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, Pb, Mo, V, Cr, Ti and P in Pacific pelagic clays

Average abundances of Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, Pb, Mo, V, Cr, Ti and P in Pacific pelagic clays

To SUPPLZMENT W-l and the now depleted G-l, issued by the U.S. Geological Survey, various; institutions have processed new reference samples. Analytic...

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To SUPPLZMENT W-l and the now depleted G-l, issued by the U.S. Geological Survey, various; institutions have processed new reference samples. Analytical data for those now sumplcs MY now being published at an increasing rate. FLANAGAN (1969) has published the first compilation of data for the now U.S. Geological Survey rocks. From the collected data it is apparent t(hat some rock analysts are inclined t,o adopt the unsatisfactory habit of not reporting the content of hygroscopic water (H,O-). When a reference sample was prepared, the content of hygroscopic water was probably t,hc same in all bottles. The moisture content may change in the reserve supply of bottles of 5 sample stored in the same location by the issuing organization, but these changes should be about the same far a11 bottles. The participating laboratories are, however, geographically separated and the different conditions of temperature and humidity during storage may hare zl pronounced effect II~OII the content of water. The U.S. Geological Survey reference sample AGV-I may be used as an illustration of the possible effects. From the datist of GOLDICH et aE. (1967) it is seen that this sample may contain appreciable amounts of water. A bottle of this sample was stored in our laboratory at room temperature for about two years before analysis; the content of hygroscopic water was then found to be 0.05 %, as compared with l-20 oA reported by the above authors. The widely scattered values for the content of H,O- in AGV-I from the data tabulated by FLANAOAN (1969) also demonstrate the effects of varying conditions during storing. It seems obvious that analytical data for reference rocks should not be compared without taking into consideration the content of hygroscopic water. Analyses without data for H,Oare incomplete and of limited value. As pointed out by STEVENS and KIms (1960), the comparison of analytical results would be greatly facilitated if the data were reported on a moisturclfree basis. REFERENCEB

FLANAGAN F. J. (1969) U.S. Geological Survey standards-II. First compilation of data for the new U.S.G.S. rocks. #em&m. co8~oc~~~.~e~a 38, 81-120. GOLDICH S. S., INOAMELLS C. O., SUHR N. H. and ANDERSON D. H. (1967) Analyses of silicate rock and mineral standards. Cura. J. lWth Sei. 4, 747-755. SEVENS R. E. and NILES W. W. (1900) Second report on a cooperative investigation of the composition of two silicate rocks. U.S. Geol. SUW. Bull. 1113.

Qeochimicaet CosmochimicG Acta, 1969,Vol.33,pp. 1582 to 1565. PersamonPreen. Print& in Northern Irelmd

Average abandmmet? of Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, Pb, #IO, V, Cr, !l!i and P in Ptmific pelagic &ws Department

of Geology,

D. S. CRONAN University of Ottawa,

Ottawa

2, Canada

(Received 30 July 1969; accepted 13 August 1969) These analytioal data on twenty-six Pa&o pelagic clay samples are presented. data together with previously published analyses have been used to calculate the average abundances of some elements in Pacific clay sediments.

AbatnM--New

A TOTAL of twenty-six clay sediment samples collected by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography from widely spaced localities at the sediment surface in the Pacific Ocean have been analysed for the elements Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, Pb, MO, V, Cr and Ti by optical spectrography, The analyses were conducted in the Applied G~~h~rn~st~ and for P by a calorimetric technique. Department of Imperial College, London, and the methods used have been discussed by CROSAN and TOOMS (1969). The analytical data and sample locations are listed in Table 1. The average abundances of the elements determined are presented in Table 2, together with

1663

Notes Table 1. Location and partial chemical armlyms of twenty-six Pa&c fh ‘Fpt*%I Loastion

CoreNo.*

Lat. 1&‘04’N 11°40’8 11026’S 1%o44’s 8’48’N 22*67/N 22’57’N 40’29’N 36’29’N 9’27’N 13’32’N 1 1°66’N 14’39’N lSQI%‘N 11’30’N 11‘=28’N 0034’S 8OO%‘N 12”31’N lO”Ol’N 20’19’N 14O26’N 14’66’N lP66’N 11°61’N 11061/N

Amp 3P Amp 84u Amp 8t3UV Cap 24HG DWBG 7 Hilo 4G Hilo [email protected] Jyn II 8U Jyn II 21U Jyn V 13Q Jyn V 29GI Jyn V 31PC+ Jyn V 471? Jyn V 6OPG LSDH 87P LSDH 95G Proa 113P Pro8 1390 Proa 1820 Pros 176U Ris SV Ris 8V Ris 111PG Ris 1IlV wah 2P Wah 2PG

co O-0130 0.0160 0.0160 0~0160 0.0130 0.0130 O-0086 0~0020 O-0020 0~0200 0~0100 0~0100 0.0130 0~0100 0.0160 0.0086 0.0130 o-0130 0.0085 0.0040 0~0160 O~OlOO 0~0100 0.0130 0.0130 O-0086

pelagic clay samples

cu o-020 0.020 0.013 0.01% 0.040 o-020 0~01% O-010 O-013 0.086 0.016 0.020 0.040 0.01% O-030 0.013 o-030 0.020 o-020 0.01% 0.020 0.020 o-030 0.020 O-020 0.016

Pb [email protected] 0.0060 ow20 0~0130 0~0030 O*OOBO 0.0040 0.0013 O-0030 0.0040 0~0020 0.0020 0.0020 O~OO30 0~0030 0~0020 0.0040 O‘OO40 0~0030 0.0040 0~0020 0.0030 0.0040 0~0040 0~0030 0~0030

Long.

Depth (m)

126’=06’W 160°1%‘W l61~37W l%1°22W 130=4sw 143’68’W 143’6%‘W 172’33’E 146’43% 160’42’W 146’02’W 144’64’W 136’04’W 131046W 177”PS’E 1%S061’W 176O13’W 170’26’W 172’61’W 1%l”36’W 117”29W 117’12W 133O29W 133=‘29‘W 162’68’W lb2°6%‘W

614% 6302 4686 4917 4760 4860 4260 6720 6100 6286 6639 4813 6210 6620 6286 4837 6444 6464 4924 4010 4126 4770 4770 6221 6221

MO

o+O13 0.0020 0.0006 0.0008 0.001% 0.0008 0.0006 0.0002 O+OlO o+O30 0~0002 0.0002 0.0013 0.0006 0.0060 o+OO2 O-0006 o+Oos 0~0010 0.0002 0.0030 0~0010 0~001% o+Oo5 0~0005 0.0002

V o-0130 O-0160 O-0040 O-0160 0.0086 0.0200 0.0130 0*0040 O*OIOO O-OO%O 0~0100 0-0060 0.0200 0.0130 0.0130 0~0130 0.0160 0+X360 0.0130 0~0100 0.0160 0.0160 0~0100 0.0130 O-0130 O-0086

Mn 0.440 0.840 1.260 O-860 0.720 0.290 O-326 0.660 0286 1.760 0.270 0,370 0.236 0.380 O-600 0.17% 0.600 0380 0.320 0.120 0*8OO 0.370 O-860 0.310 O.410 0.286

cr 04080 0.0040 o+O20 0.0060 O-0040 0.0130 0~0060 0~0010 0.0040 0.0020 0.0060 0.0060 0~0060 o-0130 0~0030 O-0040 0.0160 0.0030 0.0086 0.0160 O+l86 0.0086 0.0030 O~OlOO 0.0060 O-0060

Fe

Ni

540 7.30 14.00 8.30 1.90 6.20 3.00 1.70 2.26 6.00 3.46 4.00 4.80 6.20 3.00 2-15 7.60 3.46 4.70 1.06 6s60 6.90 490 3.60 2.80 3-00

0.0200 0.0200 0.0160 O-0160 0~0160 0~0160 o-0200 0.0130 0.0060 0.0860 0.0130 0~0160 O-0200 O-0160 0.0300 o-0130 0.0400 O-0300 0.0200 0.0086 0~0200 0*02OO O-0300 0~0160 0~0160 0.0130

Ti

P

0.40 0.30 0.30 O-60 0.20 0.50 0.30 0.10 0.20 0.20 0.30 0.30 0.60 0.30 0.30 0‘20 1.00 0.16 0.30 O-%0 0.30 0.30 o-30 0.40 0.30 0.20

O-360 0.180 0.160 0.080 0.110 0.070 0.020 O-024 o-200 0.140 0.070 0.140 0.040 o-400 o-110 O-240 O-080 0.160 0.100 0.070 0~060 0.110 o-070 0.100 O-120

O*O%O

* The terms Amp, Cap, DW, Hilo, Jyn. LSDH, Proa, Rii and Wah are wed reapeotively to deaignata oowl oolleotad on the Ample&rite, Caprioom, Downwind, Rile, Japenyon, Luaiad, Proa, Rispao and W&be expeditione of tho Soripp Imtitution of Oceanography. The suffixes P, 0, PC+end V refer respectively to piston oores, gravity [email protected], gravity ccws taken simultaneously with piston aores, and heat flow cores.

1564

xotes

TabIe 2. Average abundances of some elements in various suites of’ Pacific pelagio clay sediments (in wt. %)

--_.

1 .._

M4 Fe Ni CO CU

Pb MO

V cr Ti P

3

4

I.0260 6.4400 0.0280 0.0163 0.0678 0.0141 0.0041 0,0326 0.0133 0.6630

0.7060 &0600 0.0266 0.0111 0*0515 0*0088 0.0043 0.0323 0.0162 0.6680

2

6

5

____-

0.5230 4.6020 0.0210 0.0113 0.0230 0.0034 0~0010 0.0117 0.0064 0.3369 0.1259

0.3670 6*6400 0~0296 0.0098 0.0439 0.0181 0.0015 0.0460 0.0068 0.6090 o-0720

7

--

0.4600 5.0900

8

0.6240 5.7040

0.3920

6.0000 0.0125 0.006 I 0.0161 0.0033 0.0011 0*0200 0.0110 04430

0.0164 0.0096

00162 0*0151 0.6273

0~8OOO 0‘0780

1. Averageof 26 sampies, this work. 2. Average of 8 samples, EL WAKEEL end &my (1961). 3. Avmge of 21 mmples,()OLDBEBQ and &ammMos (1968). 4. Average of 13 semph?,&X,W3EBQ and &UtEENIUS (1968). 5. Averegaof 11 samplea, YOUNG (1968). 6. Average of 108 samplea, SKOBNYAKOVA (1966). 7. Averageof 7 samples, SWANSON et aE, (1967). 8. Average of 10 samples, Revelle, reported in SWRDBUP et aE. (1942).

averages derived from other published data on Pacific olays for comparison. Averages for certain of the elements differ quite considerably, but this oan partly be accounted for by oompositional variations within the Pa&o basin. Most of the averages are bsaed OR a limited number of samples and therefore cannot be consideredto be representativeof Pa&o alays as a whole. Purthermore, some of the differencescan probably be related to the in&zsion of ferrorn~g~ese nodules and micronodules in a proportion of the samples anslysed. For example, the Pacific clay average calculated from the data of GOLDBERU and A.~~X%XNIUS (1968) (Table 2, column 3) includes analyses of several samples containing abundant ferromanganesedeposits. Recalculation of this average to exclude these samples (Table 2, column 4) results in lower values for many of the elements recorded. Table 3. Average abundances of Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, Pb, MO, V, Cr, Ti and P in Pacifio pelagic clays (in wt. ‘A) Mn 0.4784

Fe? 6.0669

Ni

co

CU

Pb

MO

V

cr

Ti

P

0.0211

0.0101

0.0323

0*0068

0*0018

O-0216

0~0102

0.4648

0.1062

Using the data in Table 2, excluding column 3, new average abundances of Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, Pb, MO, V, Cr, Ti and P in Pa&c pelagic clay sediments have been derived (Table 3). Xuah reuent work has shown that eertain areas of the Pa&& Ocean oontain chemically distinctive sediments (e.g. LYNN and BOXAWX, 1966; BO~TROMSt &, 1969) and it is hoped that the new averages presented in this work might serve as a useful reference with which such sediments can be compared. [email protected] writer is indebted to the laboratory staff of the Applied Geoohemistry Department, Imperial College, for assistancewith the analyses and to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography for providing the samples. Financial support was given by N.E.R.C. REFERENCES

BOSWOM R., PETERSON M. N. A., JOIQNSW 0. and FIS~R D. E. (1989) Aluminium-poor ferromanganoansediments on active oceanictridges. J. U~~~3. Rea. 7% 3261-3270. CRONA_N D. 8. and TOOMS5. S. (1969) The ge~~ist~ of rn~~e nod&es and associated pdagia deposits from the Pa&u and Indian Oceans. &z~p-Se~ Pm. I$, 336-369.

Not%8

1566

EL WAXEEL S. K. and RILEY J. P. (1961) Chemic~ and minemlogical studies of deep-sea sediments, &ochim. Coamochim.Acta #j, 116-146. GOLDBXCW E. D. end Ammmrus G. 0. S. (1958) Chemistry of Pa&f% p&q& sediments. &whim. Coamoohdm.Aota 18,163-212. LYNN D. C. and BONATR E. (1965) Mobility of manganese iu diagenesis of deep-sea sediments. Mar. Geol. 8, 457474. SKORNYAKOVAN. S. (1965) Dispersed iron and manganese in Pwifio Ocean sediments. Int. Beot. Rev. 7, 2161-2174 S~ERDRUPH. U., JOECNSON M. W. and FZEMJXUR. H. (1942). The Ooeane, 1087 pp. PrenticeHall, SWABSONV. E., PALAGASJ. G. and LOVE Awwz~ H. (1967) Geochemistry of deep-sea sediment along the 160°W meridian in the North P&& Oceau. U.S. &oE. Swv. Pmf. Paper 67&B, 137-144. YOUNG E. J. (1968) Sp~tro~&p~~ d&a on coree from the Pacific Ocean aad the Gulf of Mexioo. &ochim. Coamochim.A&z i#&466-471.