Concern Network

Concern Network

Air Medical Journal 35 (2016) e9 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Air Medical Journal journal homepage: http://www.airmedicaljournal.com/ ...

147KB Sizes 2 Downloads 95 Views

Air Medical Journal 35 (2016) e9

Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

Air Medical Journal journal homepage: http://www.airmedicaljournal.com/

Concern Network The Concern Network shares verified information to alert medical transport programs when an accident/incident has occurred. Both air and ground programs are encouraged to participate. The reports are shown here verbatim as they were filed. If you have questions, contact CONCERN Coordinator David Kearns at (800) 332-3123 or [email protected] 11/19/2015 1145 PST REACH Air Medical Services 451 Aviation Blvd, Ste 101 Santa Rosa, CA 95403 Type: EC135P2 Tail #: N36RX Weather: Clear. Not a factor Team: Pilot, flight nurse, flight paramedic and 2 passengers. No injuries reported. No patient. Description: While conducting live training with a local fire department at their training facility, a flight crew was performing mock loading and unloading procedures, along with multiple landings and takeoffs of the helicopter. The pilot and crew had performed two landings and takeoffs prior to the event with no observable FOD within the landing zone other than a closed container box (Conex type). At the time of the third approach to landing, while on short final, they witnessed a door of the container box open, which allowed a large towel to blow out and into the fenestron tail rotor assembly. The pilot felt a sudden shudder of the airframe and elected to immediately land the aircraft and perform an immediate shutdown of the engines. Postflight inspection revealed significant damage to tail rotor blades and fenestron as a result of the foreign object damage (FOD).

1067-991X/$36.00 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amj.2016.03.004

The pilot and crew performed flawlessly in their immediate and decisive action to land the aircraft. The company activated the Emergency Notification Response Plan per communication requirements and have made the necessary contact to our FAA and NTSB representatives in accordance with regulations. Source: Vicky Spediacci, VP Aviation Operations 12/10/2015 0815 PT PANDA Transport Team Doernbecher Children's Hospital 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd. Portland, OR 97239-9979 Model: GM - specialty care ambulance Type: Type III Weather: Overcast, cloudy but not raining Road: Wet Team: Paramedic, Respiratory Therapist. Injuries. Description: The paramedic and respiratory therapist were driving out to the airport to pick up a backup flight stretcher for a planned long distance back transport for a patient at Doernbecher Children's Hospital. The ambulance, while travelling at the posted speed, approached an intersection with another car waiting to turn left across traffic. As the ambulance was entering the intersection, the waiting car began turning

left causing the driver of the ambulance to slam on the brakes. Unable to avoid the turning car, the ambulance travelling at between 40 and 50 mph, impacted the side of the car with the front passenger portion of the ambulance, causing both driver and passenger airbag deployment. A Level 3 PAIP was activated by the communication center with corresponding communication between pertinent hospital and transport team staff. The driver of the ambulance and car were uninjured, while the RT (ambulance passenger) sustained injury requiring hospitalization. He was released from the hospital two days later. The transport was cancelled that day and the patient was later transported the next day by the receiving facility. Additional Info: Metro West followed up with a root cause analysis, with recommendations to be implemented concerning communication, training, and equipment. PANDA/Doernbecher followed up with a Post Accident Review (PAR) with all key players involved in the accident and activation and follow through of the PAIP. This PAR has led to changes in clarification and changes in the PAIP process, along with some changes in the communication process between the transport team and the communication center. Source: Mark Schleicher RRT Clinical Lead for the PANDA Team