Driven by Distraction: Sustainable Road Safety and the Impact of Autonomous Driving on Vulnerable Users (breakout presentation)

Driven by Distraction: Sustainable Road Safety and the Impact of Autonomous Driving on Vulnerable Users (breakout presentation)

Abstracts / Journal of Transport & Health 7 (2017) S4–S87 S65 Conclusions: Social innovation is a growing method for dealing with complex modern iss...

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Abstracts / Journal of Transport & Health 7 (2017) S4–S87

S65

Conclusions: Social innovation is a growing method for dealing with complex modern issues. Transportation once guided by trend-based models, is being disrupted to its core by new technology. New techniques are needed to assess the social impact and policies required of new services and automation, not least of which is the effect on hard-won pro-walking policies. The MI-Lab is intended to bridge this gap and demonstrate opportunity through experimentation. The Walk 21 conference will be one of the first opportunities to hear how this will work. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jth.2017.11.104

Driven by Distraction: Sustainable Road Safety and the Impact of Autonomous Driving on Vulnerable Users (breakout presentation) Mário Alves Secretary General of the International Federation of Pedestrians

This presentation first it will deal with how pedestrians will have to be taken into account by Autonomous Vehicles (AV) and second with how this new technology will impact sustainable mobility and cities in general. Twentieth century cities were shaped by motorization while humanity is still moving towards different forms of urban settlements. Half of those dying on the world's roads are “vulnerable road users” outside of potential AV. From the easier challenge of finding algorithms for AV in open intra-urban roads, the debate should shift to how to tackle safety in urban roads and assure more sustainable and equitable Transportation as a Service (TaaS) models. Pedestrians pose very complex challenges to AV. Being a pedestrian is a universal condition - no ability test is necessary. Hopefully there will always be people walking the streets who are unpredictable and physiologically unable to assess danger - a well designed system should prioritise the safety of the most vulnerable. Therefore, we will argue that pedestrian safety should be yardstick to measure the quality of any ethical system and the centerpiece of the debate. However, there is a lot to be done using available and affordable technology: Transit Oriented Communities have about one-fifth of the per capita traffic casualty rate as automobile-oriented communities. Moreover, fatalities and injuries are only a small part of the car externalities - congestion, pollution, space waste will not disappear with AV. Automation might in fact reduce considerably the cost of driving, thus increasing the aforementioned externalities. Only a smart use of technology, serving clear sustainable mobility objectives, will be able to avoid worse consequences. We will argue that we are all better off with carless drivers instead of driverless cars. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jth.2017.11.105

Moral and Ethical Aspects of Autonomous Vehicles and Mobility (breakout presentation) n

Ryan Martinson

Stantec, Canada; [email protected]

The way we travel around our cities and regions should not put a burden on other people or impose on their individuals rights, including dignity. This presentation outlines some of the moral questions that we are facing currently and those that are being more prevalent with the advent of new technologies. Rights and morality from other practices such as climate change, land use planning, and livability are described and some of the key issues to consider when developing a set of moral principles for mobility are described. Finally, a potential framework for Morality in Mobility is shared for reaction and debate. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jth.2017.11.106