Effect of boundary lubricants on the friction of cast iron

Effect of boundary lubricants on the friction of cast iron

ABSTRACTS COMPILED BY PAMELA POCOCK AND A. D. JORDAN Copies of original articles are best obtained by writing direct to the journal in which they ap...

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ABSTRACTS

COMPILED BY PAMELA POCOCK AND A. D. JORDAN

Copies of original articles are best obtained by writing direct to the journal in which they appeared. The addresses of journals can be found in a reference book such as World List of Scientific and Technical Publications, Willings Press Guide, and f o r American journals only,Ayers.

ALBERTSON, A., WOLFRAM, R. C. Effect of houmiary lubricants on the friction of cast iron. Lubrication Engineering, Vol 25, No 12 (Dec 1970) pp 469-474 Friction t es t s were made in 0 to 100% additive-white oil blends of constant viscosity, with cast iron specimens, to determine the effect of additive concentration on static and dynamic friction. Friction was nearly the same from 1°/0to 100°/0 concentration, at 0 to 50 f t / m i n sliding speed, for se ve ra l boundary lubricants. The small effect of additive concentration on friction indicated the additives were nearly fully absorbed at 1°/0concentration. The white oil appeared to act only as a diluent in the additive blends, (3 figures, 6 tables, 3 references) (Tribology 1970, abstract 359)

ALLEN, C. M., DRAUGLIS, E. Boundary layer lubrication: m o n o l a y e r or mulUlayer. Wear, Vol 14, No 5 (Nov 1969) pp 363-384 This article is a critical review of some literature on the properties of liquids squeezed between two solid flats. There was considerable evidence to support the concept of longrange order in films. These films have flow properties which can be related to the molecular species involved, the substrate material, temperature and imposed stress. Although se ve ra l physical models have been postulated to explain the multilayered film they are still to be proven. (15 figures, 5 tables, 28 references) (Tribology 1970, abstract 360)

ALLEN, C. W., TOWNSEND, D. P., ZARETSKY, E. V. Elastoll~drodynamic l u b r i c a t i o n of a spizmtng ball in a non-conforming groove. Transactions of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Journal of Lubrication Technology, Vol 92, Series F, No 1 (Jan 1970) pp 87-96 An elastohydrodynamic solution for the spinning torque of a ball, spinning without roiling in a non-conforming groove, is presented. The solution is compared with experimental results using a synthetic paraffinic oil as the lubricant. A modified pressure-viscosity relation is proposed. The theory predicts increases in torque with stress and spinning speed and decreasing conformity. Good agreement was obtained between theoretical predictions and experimental results. (13 figures, 1 table, 17 references) (Tribology 1970, abstract

ARMSTRONG, E. L., LINDEMAN, M. A., WAYNE, H . J . Wheel-beariNg t e s t N~mratus for automotive g r e a s e r s . National Lubricating Grease Institute Spokesman, Vol 33, No 10 (Jan 1970) pp 358-365 Desirable properties of a grease for use in automotive frontwheel bearings include: negligible off leakage; low-torque at below zero temperatures and low speed; long life at high temperatures and high speed; and resistance to fretting c o r rosion. In order to evaluate these grease properties in the laboratory, a t a p e r - r o l l e r bearing test apparatus was developed. The apparatus consists of two test units: a rotational torque-measuring device for oil leakage, low temperature torque, and life testing; and an oscillator unit for frettingcorrosion testing. This paper describes a test apparatus, outlines procedures and presents typical test results. (8 figures, 5 tables) (Tribology 1970, abstract 363) ASTON, R. L., O'DONOGHUE, J. P., ROWE, W. B. Design of conical hydrostatic jourmfl bearimgs. Mechanlcai and Production Engineering, Vol 116, No 2988 (Feb 1970) pp 250-254 A conical arrangement for hydrostatic journal bearings may be an advantage for two reasons. First, this arrangement eliminaies the need for separate thrust and journal bearings, and secondly, clearance is easily adjustable on assembly. The basic principle of the bearing is described and the mathematics of the design procedures ar e presented. (9 figures, 4 references) (Tribology 1970, abstract 364)

361)

BONE SS, R. J. The e f f e c t of oil supply on cage and r o l l e r motion in a lubricated r o l l e r bearing. Transactions of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Journal of Lubrication Technology, Vol 92, Series F, No 1 (Jan 1970) pp 39-53 Experimental results indicate that oil supply can have a significant effect on cage and r o l l e r motion in a lubricated roller bearing. A theoretical analysis is presented which enables cage and r o l l e r motion, for various operating conditions, to be predicted. The theoretical results imply that r e ducing the oil supply to a minimum value required to maintain full hydrodynamic conditions, reduces cage slip by up to 75% of its fully flooded values. This conclusion is consistent with existing experimental evidence. (24 figures, 8 r e f e r ences) (Tribology 1970, abstract 365)

ANDERSON, W. D., DELLINGER, C. L. D e s e r t and load rating analysls of the elastic support for a large r o l l e r bearing. Transactions of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Journal of Lubrication Technology, Vol 92, Series F, No 1 (Jan 1970) pp 113-120 The basic oxygen furnace c o m p r is e s a tiltable v e s s e l supported by two trunnions in large r o l l e r bearings. To accomodate thermal expansion, the floating bearing is mounted on a deep curved beam which moves axially on two linear bearings. Under loads of 1-2 million pounds, the elastic deflection of this bearing a l t e r s the static load capacity of the roller bearing. This paper describes a computer assisted analysis based on Castigliano's f i r s t theorem for determining the effective bearing capacity, and secondly for optimizing the bearin.g design. (8 figures, 2 tables, 6 references) (Tribology 1970), abstract 362)

BOOTSMA, J. The e f f e c t of viscosity variations with temperature and the performm~ce of spiral groove lmartmgs. Transactions of the American Society of Lubrication Engineers, Vol 12, No 4 (Oct 1969) pp 287-296 The load capacity and power loss of spiral groove bearings, lubricated with a Newtonian, incompressible liquid with a v i s cosity depending on temperature, are determined by solving the continuity and momentum equations analytically and the energy equation for the grooves and ridges numerically. It is assumed that the total flow perpendicular to the relative velocity of the bearing parts is zero. This implies that the generated heat is discharged by conduction to the bearing parts only. The effect of the 'thermal entrance region' is investigated. (8 figures, 8 references) (Tribology 1970, abstract 366)

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TRIBOI.X~Y M a y 1970