European Research on Material Substitution

European Research on Material Substitution

236 Book reviews Although less than 100 pages long, and arguably expensive in relative terms, the book is a most readable treatise on delamination b...

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236

Book reviews

Although less than 100 pages long, and arguably expensive in relative terms, the book is a most readable treatise on delamination buckling. It is a well-written, coherent volume which gently takes the reader through the various analytical techniques which can be employed. Apart from a very rudimentary understanding of buckling and fracture mechanics, no prior knowledge is necessary to make full use of its contents. Leaving aside the obvious technical merits of this book, it was more than slightly surprising to note the large typeface and excessive spacings used throughout. Likewise the various figures contained therein, which were allocated one full page each, could easily have been condensed without detracting from their usefulness. Overall the reader could be forgiven for thinking that the book could have been condensed by a significant margin with appropriate reductions in cost. I. H. Marshall

European Research on Material Substitution. Edited by I. V. Mitchell and H. Nosbusch. Commission of European Communities, Brussels, Belgium. Elsevier Applied Science Publishers, London, 1988. ISBN 1-85166-224-3. Price: £69.00.

A substantial volume of slightly over 600 pages, this is a summary of 53 projects within five research areas which were selected by the European Commission for Support within the multi-annual research and development programme on Substitution of Materials Technologies (1982-1985). It constitutes the proceedings of the final contractors' meeting on this research programme held in late 1986. The primary aim of the programme was stated to be 'to reduce, by a substitution policy, the use in the European Industry of certain raw materials where the future supply of those materials might become less accessible for various economic or political reasons'. It provides an interesting insight into a substantial initiative, in both financial and philosophical terms, which considers the broad base of industrial materials. In an ever changing world, in every sense of the word, such initiatives may well be the order of the day in future years. With such thoughts in mind, the book should be equally useful to corporations when considering their materials replacement policy and also to individuals considering potential alternative materials. As a reference text, the book deserves to find its way into most large technical libraries. 1. H. Marshall