High magnetic fields, proceedings of the International Conference on High Magnetic Fields, 1961

High magnetic fields, proceedings of the International Conference on High Magnetic Fields, 1961

BOOK REVIEWS 393 problems are well known. The chapter on measurement techniques is extensive and along with the rest of the book contains profusive...

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BOOK

REVIEWS

393

problems are well known. The chapter on measurement techniques is extensive and along with the rest of the book contains profusive references to the literature. Chap. 11 on scattering-matrix analysis discusses the application of this concept to non-reciprocal devices. The last chapter, on microwave devices, is an up-to-date reference that treats the theory and design of isolators, circulators, switches and, especially, power limiters. Areas of investigation that have either been omitted or discussed only briefly are the fields of magnetoelastic and magneto-optical effects. However, neither area had reached a stage of development where it necessarily should have been included. The authors are to be thanked for their many years of work on this valuable contribution to the literature of solid-state physics.

present day research utilizing those fields. This balance is, in turn, reflected in the book. Part 1 dealiag with the problems attendant upon generation of high magnetic fields is in point of fact a valuable treatise for the modern magnet designer that, in itself, makes this an indispensable library volume by contrast with most “proceedings” volumes. M. W. GARRETT’S paper on the method of Zonal Harmonics is an example in point and is suggestive of the novel and fresh thinking that has been introduced into classical problems of magnet design (although this reviewer confesses to a lamentable mental block in looking at magnetic fields on the MKS system). The volume also contains a valuable progress report on the utilization of high critical field superconducting materials in the design of superconducting magnets as well as progress in research on such materials. The record breaking meeting-publicaR. L. COMSTOCK tion relaxation time makes it possible to put in Bell Telephone Laboratories, Inc. sharp focus the many exciting contributions Murray Hill, New Jersey that characterized that prolific race toward record shattering supercurrents. The organizers, editors and publishers should be equally complimented of mushrooming Editors: HENRY KOLAR,BENJAMINLAX, FRANCISBITTER for so ably sharing the excitement and ROBERT MILLS: High Magnetic Fields, Pro“fields” within the world of science. ceedings of the International Conference on High Magnetic Fields, 1961. MIT Press and John Wiley, New York, 1962. pp. 751, 315.00.

THE publication of proceedings of conferences is becoming a popular pastime for publishers, journals and would-be editors. One is sometimes given to wonder how valuable such compilations really are. For most scientific gatherings, a proceedings compilation is superfluous in that the worthwhile contributions should and do find their way into the reputable and refereed technical literature while the less worthwhile opuses are gratified out of proper proportion by their This collection of papers appearance in print. presented at the MIT Conference on High Magnetic Fields is, indeed, a notable exception. High magnetic field research is at the very frontier of present day solid state physics and chemistry, plasma and fusion physics and will have potential impact on biophysics, cryogenics and a host of other active areas of contemporary research. The Conference organizers put in proper balance and perspective the matter of technique for producing high magnetic fields and the status of

Scientific Laboratory, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, Michigan.

M. N. STRAIN: Mathematical nologists. D. van Nostrand, 89.25.

J. E. GOLDMAN

Methods for TechNew York, 1961.585 pp.,

THIS book was written by members of the Mathematics Department of the Birmingham College of Advanced Technology as a textbook to complete the undergraduate mathematical training of engineers. Many books aiming at a similar purpose have appeared in the last decades; the present one differs somewhat in its selection of topics from most books of this type in including some more basic topics and leaving out more advanced ones, which presumably reflects the interests of the authors in pr0vidin.g an undergraduate book. In fact, the chapter titles cover the complete undergraduate curriculum in mathematics for engineers. The consequence of this wealth of both