Introduction to Physiological Optics

Introduction to Physiological Optics

206 BOOK NOTICES cal intervention does not lead to improvement and is hazardous as to life. Nonsurgical treatments considered include cyanide of mer...

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BOOK NOTICES

cal intervention does not lead to improvement and is hazardous as to life. Nonsurgical treatments considered include cyanide of mercury (with either positive or negative Wassermann), the iodides, and X rays. Favorable surgical results have occurred especially in cases of relatively recent onset, in which the visual acuity was not greatly reduced or had only been reduced for a short time; in which the visual fields did not present extensive peripheral or central changes; and in which the disc did not show much atrophy. Results have been unfavorable in cases of long standing, with very poor or no visual acuity, marked visual-field changes, and an atrophic disc. The volume is well illustrated, with numerous X-ray reproductions; and the text is supplemented by tabular analysis of 63 cases in the literature and 66 French cases here published for the first time; as well as by an extensive bibliography. W. H. Crisp. A TEXT-BOOK OF OPHTHALMIC OPERATIONS. By Harold Grimsdale and Elmore Brewerton. Third edition, clothbound, 322 pages, 105 illustrations. Baltimore, William Wood and Company, 1937. Price $6.00. This is the third edition of an excellent textbook. The second edition was printed in 1920, and in the present volume the same system of classification and diagrammatic illustrations is used. The special new feature is the surgery of retinal detachment. In the preface the authors state that the space devoted to historical operations has been curtailed, and instead more details of operations have been included. The book impresses the reviewer as essentially sound and of value especially to the student of ophthalmology. It ob-

viously is not aU inclusive, as, for example, the subject of the handling of a dislocated lens mentions nothing of the aid given by the use of fluorescence, with which adjunct the statement, "Dislocated lenses are usually regarded as almost inoperable," loses its point. There are many references and a good index. Lawrence T. Post. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSIOLOGICAL OPTICS. By James P. C. Southall. Clothbound, 426 pages, many diagrams. Published by Oxford University Press, 1937. Price $5.50. The author's name at once stamps the book as first-class, for his recent "Mirrors, prisms and lenses" was a most authoritative treatise. The two works in fact supplement one another, and the earlier is frequently given as reference in the one under review. The title suggests a simplified Or superficial consideration of the subject. Most practicing ophthalmologists will find, however, that much of the material has been dealt with deeply; this may possibly be disappointing to the clinician who is not prepared for, nor interested in, mathematics. For instance, the chapters on ocular movements deal first with rotation of the globe within the orbit according to geometric lines and laws. Binocular vision is considered from the standpoint of projection, stereopsis, overlapping fields, and so forth. Therefore, if one were looking for clinical information on "muscles" and orthoptics it would not be found. This is not mentioned in criticism of the book but to point out to the clinicians the significance of the title. One objection of the reviewer has to do with the make-up. Smaller type is given to matters of lesser importance, the idea supposedly being that in such form

BOOK NOTICES

of printing the reader may more readily select what is most important and what may be safely disregarded. The reviewer is always tempted to include the material in fine print and because the print is fine the reading is unduly difficult. Otherwise the format is excellent. The author has done much to keep alive what might be a dull subject by including numerous historical notes. The book is thoroughly reliable and should be welcomed by those interested in this subject. H. Rommel Hildreth. ELEMENTI DI BIOMICROSCOPIA OCULARE. By G. Sala. 206 pages, 88 figures. Bologna, Licinio Cappelli Ed. This is the first manual of biomicroscopy of the eye for the use of the practicing ophthalmologist to appear in the Italian language. The hook is divided into two parts: part one gives a detailed description of the Zeiss slitlamp and enters into a discussion of the principles of the

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biomicroscopic examination. The technique of the examination with the aid of the various illuminations is well described and much useful information is given for the interpretation of the findings. The second part deals with the various structures of the eye, and the chapters are divided according to anatomic precedence antero-posteriorly, from conjunctiva to vitreous. Gonioscopy is briefly mentioned. The author has expressed himself clearly and simply so that the book is adapted to beginners. The wealth of illustrations, some of which were made by the author, serves to give in schematic form a clear idea of the progress made with this objective examination of the eye. There is a large bibliography of some 400 references, from Italian and foreign writers, together with an index. The book will be a great help in making the use of the slitlamp popular; it deserves to be on the bookshelf of every practicing ophthalmologist for prompt consultation. V. La Rocca.