Lecture notes on ophthalmology, 5th ed.

Lecture notes on ophthalmology, 5th ed.

SURVEY OF OPHTHALMOLOGY BOOK REVIEWS VOLUME 20 l NUMBER 3 l NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1975 STEVEN M. PODOS, EDITOR Current Concepts in Cataract Surge...

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SURVEY OF OPHTHALMOLOGY

BOOK REVIEWS

VOLUME 20

l

NUMBER 3

l

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER

1975

STEVEN M. PODOS, EDITOR

Current Concepts in Cataract Surgery. Selected Proceedings of the Third Biennial Cataract Surgery Congress, edited by Jared M. Emery and David Paton. St. Louis: C. K Mosby,

1974, 442 pp., 241 illus. Price: $29.50. The Biennial Cataract Surgical Congress has become one of the most popular of all ophthalmological meetings in the United States. This book presents the papers from the Third Biennial Surgical Congress (February, 1973) that the editors considered to be most important. It would be foolish and impossible to attempt to review all the chapters in this multi-authored book. All aspects of cataract surgery are covered - from preoperative patient preparation to the operative a;ld postoperative management of all possible complications. Many of the papers are well written and clearly and adequately illustrated. Others appear to have been shortened with the deletion of necessary illustrations. Many of the articles have appeared in print elsewhere. Every section in the book is followed by interesting discussion by the more prominent cataract surgeons in this country. These roundtable discussions contain many practical suggestions for the management of patients, and, in addition, the controversial aspects of cataract surgery are clearly aired. It is unfortunate that two years have elapsed between the Congress and the publication of the proceedings. Since that time, we have witnessed the emergence of phacoemulsification, intraocular lens implantation and vitreous surgery as accepted techniques. Although these papers were discussed at the 1975 congress, must we wait another two years for these issues to appear in print. MARTIN B. KABACK lecture Notes on Ophthalmology, 5th ed., Oxford: Blackwell Scientific Publications, 1974, 125 pp., 89 illus.

by Patrick D. Trevor-Roper. Price: $7.25.

Mr. Trevor-Roper has updated (5th edition) his paperback guide to ophthalmology for medical students. Its most attractive feature is that it is organized as a handbook of differential diagnosis. Thus, after brief coverage of ocular anatomy and physiology, ocular diseases are presented in chapters such as “The Painful Red Eye,” “Gradual Loss of Sight in Quiet Eyes,” and

“Sudden Loss of Sight in Quiet Eyes.” The book is fairly well illustrated. The book contains most of the critical warnings which must be conveyed to all physicians during their exposure to ophthalmology. For example, it is noted that children with squint require prompt examination to rule out retinoblastoma, and that they need treatment to combat amblyopia. Unfortunately, the book has many detracting features. Annoyingly, many difficult ophthalmologic terms appear without introduction (i.e., sympathetic ophthalmia). More important, there are numerous factual errors (i.e., superficial punctate keratitis is not a sign of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, as stated, but a separate disease; further, the cornea1 infiltrate of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis does not “spread and damage the sight, especially if topical steroids are used”). Many poor practices are perpetuated, such as digital tonometry, administration of systemic steroids six times a day rather than as a bolus, and application of compresses to eyes with uveitis “as hot as . . . (the patient) can bear it.” Unsupportable theories abound - Eales’ disease due to tubercular periphlebitis, entropion due to rubbing the eyes. In all, the book’s flaws detract considerably from its clever format, and it cannot be highly recommended. PAULPALMBERG DANGOLDMAN

Pediatric Ophthalmology, edited by Robinson D. Harley. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, 1975,

1112 pp., 877 illus., 14 color plates. Price: $55.00. Contributions from 46 authors are included in this quite fine and most complete textbook on all aspects of pediatric ophthalmology. The material runs the gamut from basic issues, such as embryology and genetics, to examination techniques, diseases of the various ocular systems, and interrelationships with other organ systems and systemic diseases. It is admirable that chapters on such diverse topics as emotional components in pediatric ophthalmology, the visually handicapped child, orthoptics, anesthesia, radiologic diagnosis, low vision aids, contact lenses and dyslexia are covered. In addition to chapters on diseases of the component parts of the eye, special sections deal with pediatric neuroophthalmology, differential

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