Modelling residual stresses in sand-cast superduplex stainless steel

Modelling residual stresses in sand-cast superduplex stainless steel

Accepted Manuscript Title: Modelling residual stresses in sand-cast superduplex stainless steel Author: G. Palumbo A.Piccininni V. Piglionico P. Gugli...

5MB Sizes 0 Downloads 40 Views

Accepted Manuscript Title: Modelling residual stresses in sand-cast superduplex stainless steel Author: G. Palumbo A.Piccininni V. Piglionico P. Guglielmi D. Sorgente L. Tricarico PII: DOI: Reference:

S0924-0136(14)00399-9 http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2014.11.006 PROTEC 14170

To appear in:

Journal of Materials Processing Technology

Received date: Revised date: Accepted date:

6-9-2014 2-11-2014 3-11-2014

Please cite this article as: Palumbo, G., Piglionico, V.,Modelling residual stresses in sand-cast superduplex stainless steel, Journal of Materials Processing Technology (2014), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2014.11.006 This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain.

Modelling residual stresses in sand­cast superduplex stainless steel  G.Palumbo1, a, A.Piccininni1, b, V.Piglionico1, c, P.Guglielmi1, d, D.Sorgente1, e and L. Tricarico1, f  1DMMM – Politecnico di Bari, viale Japigia 182 – Bari, Italy 

ip t

[email protected][email protected][email protected][email protected][email protected][email protected] 

cr

 

us

Abstract 

an

A  numerical/experimental  procedure  is  proposed  for  calculating  the  residual  stress  state  during the cooling phase of the casting process of a superduplex stainless steel (ASTM A890 

M

Gr.  5A).  The  experimental  activity  consisted  of  casting,  tensile  and  creep  tests.  Casting  tests  were  used  to  set  (by  acquiring  temperature  data  at  different  points)  and  validate  (by 

d

measuring  displacements  after  releasing  residual  stresses  by  cutting)  the  Finite  Element 

te

model.  Tensile  and  creep  tests  were  used  to  determine  the  material  properties  from  room 

Ac ce p

temperature  to  1200°C.  A  fully  coupled  thermo‐mechanical  analysis  was  conducted  by  neglecting the presence of the sand mould; instead, attention was focused on the material by  modelling the creep behaviour using the Bailey–Norton formulation. Measurements of the of  the  displacements  due  to  the  stress  release  after  EDM  wire  cuts  revealed  to  be  in  good  agreement with the numerical model and confirmed the key role played by viscosity during  the cooling phase. Neglecting the viscous strain led to an overestimation (more than twofold)  of  the  stress  level  in  the  cast  part  after  the  cooling  phase  in  the  sand  mould.  The  good  matching  between  experimental  and  numerical  data  indicated  that  a  numerical  model  that  incorporates the creep behaviour is able to accurately capture the investigated phenomenon,  despite the simplification in the modelling of the casting process (sand mould replaced with  virtual  convection)  which  does  not  substantially  affect  its  accuracy.  The  robustness  of  the 

 

1 Page 1 of 25

methodology, which is characterised by small computational cost and good quality of results,  was further proved simulating and comparing numerical and experimental results concerning  a second casting geometry.  

ip t

 

cr

Keywords:  Superduplex  Stainless  Steels  (ASTM  A890  Gr.  5A),  Finite  Element  Method,  Residual 

us

Stresses, Casting, Creep Modelling.   

Introduction 

M

1. 

an

 

The  engineering  properties  of  materials  and  their  performance  can  be  considerably 

d

influenced by a residual state of stress. As reported by Totten et al. (2001), the contraction of 

te

adjacent  regions  characterised  by  different  cooling  rates  is  the  main  reason  why  thermal  stresses arise; if the material’s yield stress is exceeded, a residual stress state exists at room 

Ac ce p

temperature.  Such  a  phenomenon  is  common  in  many  manufacturing  processes,  like  for  example welding, cutting and casting processes.   As concerns the welding process, Kong et al. (2011) developed and validated a 3D numerical  model to predict the residual stresses for a hybrid laser‐gas metal arc welding process: they  concluded  that  increasing  the  welding  speed  led  to  a  lower  value  of  the  induced  thermal  stresses;  Olabi  and  Hashmi  (1998)  evaluated  the  residual  state  of  stress  after  the  welding  process  of  a  high‐chromium  steel  AISI  410  and  optimized  the  post‐weld  heat  treatment  for  reducing such state of stress; Anawa and Olabi (2008) proposed a statistical approach to limit  the formation of the residual stresses after the welding of dissimilar materials (AISI 316 and  low carbon steel). 

 

2 Page 2 of 25

Arif et al. (2009) used the X‐ray diffraction technique to quantify the thermal stresses induced  after  a  laser  cutting  process  for  producing  tailored  blanks:  they  found  that  both  the  sharp  temperature increase near the cutting edge and, as the laser moves away, its fast decay are the 

ip t

main causes of the residual state of stress.  As  concerns  the  casting  process,  the  residual  stress  state  negatively  affects  the  cast 

cr

2 component by creating cracks that limit performance in working  conditions or by distorting 

us

its  final  shape  before  or  after  the  machining  phase,  since  favouring  crack  nucleation  and  propagation  in  a  machined  component:  Garcia  Navas  et  al.  (2012)  evaluated  how  cutting 

an

speed, feed, tool nose radius, geometry of the tool chip breaker and coating of the cutting tool  could influence the final residual state of stress by means of X‐ray diffraction. 

M

The  numerical  modelling  of  this  phenomenon  involves  the  solution  of  the  thermal  and 

d

subsequent  mechanical  problems.  The  Finite  Difference  Method  (FDM)  is  more  efficient  for 

te

flow  analyses,  while  Finite  Element  Method  (FEM)  is  more  accurate  below  the  solidus  temperature.  In  fact,  Si  et  al.  (2003)  adopted  a  hybrid  method  in  which  temperature  maps, 

Ac ce p

calculated by an FDM solver, were imported into the FEM environment to calculate the stress  and strain fields; Liu et al. (2001), in addition to the FDM/FEM procedure, implemented the  [H]–[H|N]–[N|S]  rheological  model  for  the  quasi‐solid  zone.  Alternatively,  a  fully  coupled  thermo‐mechanical analysis can be performed. Fackeldey et al. (2000) proposed a numerical  model  capable  of  predicting  not  only  the  temperature  distribution  and  stress  evolution  but  also the dendritic structure and eutectic fraction thanks to the implementation of an accurate  micro‐structural model.  However,  the  accuracy  of  the  numerical  prediction  is  not  only  a  matter  of  the  solution  methodology,  but  it  also  depends  on  accurate  modelling  of  the  involved  materials.  Many  researchers  have  focused  their  attention  on  sand  modelling.  Baghani  et  al.  (2014) 

 

3 Page 3 of 25

demonstrated  that  modelling  the  mould  as  a  rigid  body  leads  to  an  overestimation  of  the  stresses at the end of the cooling phase and that the elasto–plastic model is the most accurate  formulation. Similarly, Motoyama et al. (2013) found good agreement between the restraint 

ip t

forces applied by the sand found both numerically and experimentally when incorporating the  elasto–plastic behaviour; the Cam‐Clay sand model adopted by Inoue et al. (2013) resulted to 

cr

be  the  most  accurate  when  comparing  numerical  and  experimental  casting  contractions. 

us

However,  modelling  the  sand  mould  and  its  properties  requires  large  computation  times,  mostly due to the necessary mesh and the interaction with the casting. Metzeger et al. (2001) 

an

thus proposed a surface element formulation capable of replacing the sand mould action with  appropriate normal forces on the casting surface in the model.  Chang and Dantzig (2004) in 

M

their work further refined the surface element formulation to take into account larger range  of mold stiffnesses, as for example the steel chills. 

d

Of  course  accurate  modelling  of  the  casting  alloy  plays  a  key  role  in  the  simulation  of  the 

te

residual stresses. In particular, considering the wide range of temperatures the materials are 

Ac ce p

subjected  to  and  the  high  strain  rate  sensitivity  at  elevated  temperatures,  fully  elastic  (or  elasto‐plastic) behaviour models may lead to inaccurate results.  Motoyama  et  al.  (2014),  even  relying  on  the  simple  elasto‐plastic  constitutive  equation,  introduced the mechanical melting temperature (the temperature level at which the material  loses the deformation resistance) to model the release of the thermal stress developed above  this  temperature:  in  such  a  way  the  authors  obtained good a fitting between numerical and  experimental measurements of the residual stresses.  On  the  other  hand,  the  rate  dependent  visco‐plasticity  material  model,  even  if  time  consuming,  is the most accurate formulation, as reported by Fachinotti and Cardona (2003)  who  presented  in  their  work  a  list  of  constitutive  equations  suitable  for  modelling  the 

 

4 Page 4 of 25

behaviour of steels at high temperature. Koric and Thomas (2008), proposed several thermo‐ elasto‐visco‐plastic constitutive equations and obtained good  agreement between numerical  and  experimental  results.  Thorborg  et  al.  (2012)  simulated  the  casting  process  of  a  pump 

ip t

house  mounting  unit  in  cast  iron  GJS  400  using  both  a  classical  time  independent  plasticity  and  a  version  of  Norton's  power  law  with  a  contribution  from  the  temperature  dependent 

cr

Arrhenius  expression  and  hardening  described  by  a  power  law  with  continuous  tangent 

us

modulus: only the numerical model implementing the time dependent formulation allowed to  obtain a satisfactory agreement with the experimental measurements of the residual state of 

an

stress. 

In the present work the elasto‐visco‐plastic constitutive equation was implemented in a fully 

M

coupled  thermo‐mechanical  Finite  Element  model.  The  sand  mould  was  not  modelled,  but  special  attention  was  paid  to  the  material  modelling  by  carrying  out  an  intensive  alloy 

d

characterization, in terms of both tensile and creep tests. In fact, the scope of this study is to 

te

present a reliable, quick and robust numerical methodology to predict residual stresses in a 

Ac ce p

sand‐cast at the end of the cooling phase. To do that: (i) displacements were measured on a  sand‐cast part after wire cutting for stress release to evaluate the accuracy of the numerical  results;  (ii)  the  sand  mould  was  not  modelled  to  reduce  computation  times  (proper  heat  transfer coefficients were determined by an inverse analysis to model the cooling in the sand  mould);  (iii)  two  different  casting  geometries  were  used  to  evaluate  the  robustness  of  the  proposed methodology.    2. 

Material & Methods 

2.1 Material characterization 

 

5 Page 5 of 25

Tensile  and creep  tests were conducted from room temperature up to 1200°C to determine  the  elasto‐visco‐plastic  characteristics  of  ASTM  A890  Gr.  5A  superduplex  stainless  steel  (chemical composition in Table 1). 

C %  <0.03 

Cr %  25.0 

Ni %  7 

ip t

Table 1. ASTM A890 Gr5A chemical composition  Mo %  4.2 

cr

 

N %  0.18 

us

According  to  McGuire  (2008),  this  alloy  is  considered  to  be  one  of  the  most  interesting 

an

stainless  steels  because  it  can  provide  both  high  mechanical  properties  and  elevated  corrosion  resistance  due  to  its  biphasic  structure.  At  the  same  time,  its  properties  can  be 

M

dramatically limited by the formation of embrittling secondary phases, which is a well‐known  phenomenon.  

d

Tensile  and  creep  tests  were  performed  using  a  Gleeble  System  3180  physical  simulator. 

te

Specimens (shown in Figure 1) were heated by the Joule effect;  a PID controller was used to 

Ac ce p

reach and maintain the target temperature based on readings from a thermocouple welded to  the middle of the specimen. Because of the elevated temperature, tests were conducted under  a high vacuum to limit material oxidation.  

a) 

 

b) 

Figure 1. Geometry (dimensions in mm) of the specimen for: (a) Tensile test; (b) Creep test 

 

2.2 Case study 

 

6 Page 6 of 25

Because residual stresses mainly depend on differences in the cooling rates in different zones  of the casting, as a case study a part similar to the one adopted in the work of Gustafsson et al.  (2009) was used: it is a sort of benchmark cast, which many authors use for investigating the 

ip t

phenomenon of residual stresses. In this study, the investigated part consists of three parallel  bars  with  different  cross  sections  whose  contraction  during  cooling  is  constrained  by  two 

d

M

an

us

cr

massive regions at both ends of the bars (Figure 2). 

te

 

Ac ce p

Figure 2. Overview of the adopted geometries 

Main  measurements  for  the  proposed  case  study  are  reported  in  Table  2.  To  check  the  robustness  of  the  proposed  methodology  and  understand  how  the  difference  in  cooling  moduli between the central and side bars affects the evolution of residual stresses, two parts  (Geometry A and B) having the same geometry but different dimensions were used.  Table 2. Case study: main measurements of the two investigated parts 

 

Measurement  Label 

Geometry A   [mm] 

Geometry B   [mm] 

B  C  D  E  F  G  H  K 

200  80  80  200  60  35  20  50 

180  80  80  190  40  35  35  40 

7 Page 7 of 25

  2.3 Casting experiments  Casting  experiments  (commissioned  to  the  CSM,  Rome)  were  performed  to  obtain 

cr

displacements in the side bars after wire cutting for stress release.  

ip t

temperature profile data during the cooling phase. Cast parts were then used to measure the 

us

Resin patterns made by Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) were used to create the sand moulds.  One half of the resin pattern was drilled to create holes for thermocouple positioning (Figure 

an

3). Temperature data were acquired using B‐type and K‐type thermocouples because both the  casting  and  mould  were  monitored;  in  particular,  B‐type  thermocouples  were  positioned  at 

M

the  casting  middle  plane,  while  the  K‐type  thermocouples  were  placed  in  the  sand,  10  mm 

Ac ce p

te

d

above the outer surface of the pattern. 

 

Figure 3. Positions of B thermocouples on the pattern 

  Figure 4. Instrumented mould 

After  the  sand  compacting  phase  (on  a  vibration  table),  the  thermocouples  were  wired  and  connected to the acquisition system (Figure 4). Temperature data were acquired during the  cooling phase (until the shake out) at a frequency of 2 Hz.  The  experimental  measurements  of  the  residual  stress  state  can  be  performed  adopting  several methods, among which the hole drilling method is often used. Thorborg et al. (2012)  adopted such a technique to evaluate the residual stress state; but in their work the authors  point  out  that  such  a  methodology  has  a  limited  accuracy,  since  it  is  based  on  the 

 

8 Page 8 of 25

transformation  of  information  from  the  strain  gauge  response  due  to  stress  redistribution  when the material is removed by drilling/removing material in the surface.   In  the  present  work  the  sectioning  technique,  included  in  the  group  of  the  destructive 

ip t

techniques by Rossini et al. (2012), was used for the experimental evaluation of the residual  stress state: such a technique relies on the measurements of deformation due to the release of 

cr

residual  stress  upon  removal  of  material  from  the  specimen.  In  order  to  minimize  material 

us

alterations  due  to  the  cutting,  the  Electro  Discharge  Machining  (EDM)  process  was  used;  as  shown in Figure 5, the stress release after the cutting was measured in terms of displacements 

 

Ac ce p

te

d

M

an

with respect to a physical reference mark created on the right massive part.  

Figure 5. Casting positioning before cut 

In  such  a  way  the  EDM  machine  was  used  to  measure  the  bar  displacement  by  putting  the  wire in contact with the bar and measuring its distance from the reference mark. The actual  position of the wire was compared with the position before the cut, thus obtaining the value of  the longitudinal displacement.    2.4 Numerical model  The  numerical  evaluation  of  the  residual  stress  was  performed  by  adopting  a  fully  coupled  thermo–mechanical  approach  using  the  commercial  code  ABAQUS  (v.  6.12,  Standard).  The 

 

9 Page 9 of 25

temperatures were integrated using a backward‐difference scheme and the nonlinear coupled 

cr

ip t

system was solved using Newton's method. The adopted FE model is shown in Figure 6.  

us

 

a) 

b) 

 

an

Figure 6. FE Model: a) front view (symmetry surfaces highlighted in red), b) rear view 

A  total  of  12,042  elements  (C3D8T  type,  eight‐node  tri‐linear  elements  with  a  temperature 

M

degree  of  freedom)  was  used;  the  mesh  was  refined  in  the  fillet  radius  regions.  The  real  dimensions  of  the  castings  were  used  for  modelling,  with  the  exception  of  the  fillets  of  the 

d

large side volumes as they were expected to have a negligible influence on the residual stress 

te

evolution. Because of the symmetry of both the geometry and boundary conditions, only half 

Ac ce p

of the case study described in the section 2.2 was modelled, thus reducing the computational  cost. In addition, this assumption was very useful for simulation of the stress release from the  wire cuts. Once the symmetry boundary conditions of the side bars were removed, they could  release the stress (it was necessary to fix points A and B in Figure 6b as additional constraints  to  avoid  numerical  issues).  The  displacement  due  to  the  stress  release  was  evaluated  as  shown in Figure 7. 

 

10 Page 10 of 25

ip t cr  

us

Figure 7. Scheme for determination of the numerical side bar displacement 

an

The distance between two fixed nodes (NODE #1 and NODE #2) was  compared before (Lbc)  and  after  (Lac)  the  removing  the  constraints.  With  regards  to  the  modelling  of  the  material 

M

behaviour, the material strain during cooling can be described by Eq. 1, which includes elastic,  thermal and plastic properties, as well as a creep strain component: 

 

te

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1) 

Ac ce p

ε tot = ε el + ε pl + ε th + ε cr  

d

 

where  εel  is  the  elastic  strain,  εpl  is  the  plastic  strain,  εth  is  the  thermal  strain  and  εcr  is  the  creep  strain.  The  elasto‐plastic  behaviour  was  modelled  using  the  Young’s  moduli  and  flow  stress curves (as a function of the temperature) found from the experiments. The creep strain  component was modelled using the Bailey–Norton law (power law creep) in Eq. 2:   

ε&cr = Aσ nt m    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(2) 

 

 

11 Page 11 of 25

Such  a  formulation,  in  its  time‐hardening  form,  includes  the  uniaxial  equivalent  deviatoric  stress (σ), total time (t) and time exponent (m) necessary to account for the contribution of  the primary creep stage.  

Results  

cr

3. 

ip t

 

3.1 Evaluation of material properties 

us

The results of the tensile tests are shown in Figure 8a. As expected, the stress‐strain curves  demonstrate that the material hardening became less evident as  the temperature increased; 

Ac ce p

te

d

M

an

above 600°C, the alloy behaviour can be considered fully plastic.  

a) 

b) 

Figure 8. Results from experimental tests: a) Tensile tests; b) Creep tests at 800°C 

In Figure 8b, strain curves from creep tests at 800°C have been plotted (up to the secondary  stage);  these  curves  show  dominance  of  the  secondary  stage,  characterised  by  the  constant  creep strain rate. Data from the creep tests were analysed so that they could be implemented  in the FE model. The values of the inelastic strain rate ( ε&in ) coupled with the corresponding  value of the applied stress ( σ ) were plotted on a double‐log graph at three different levels of  temperature (600, 800 and 1000°C), as shown in Figure 9. 

 

12 Page 12 of 25

ip t cr  

us

Figure 9. Creep test data analysis 

For each level of the investigated temperatures, data were fitted using a first‐order equation 

an

whose  slope  and  intercept  represent,  respectively,  the  stress  order  (n)  and  power  law 

M

multiplier (A) to be implemented in the FE model according to Eq. 2.   

d

3.2 Experimental data from casting experiments and stress release by cutting  

te

Temperature data (at the middle of the central and side bars) concerning the part geometries 

Ac ce p

have been plotted in Figure 10. 

Differences  in  the  temperature  profiles  of  Figure  10a  and  b  are  simply  due  to  the  different  cooling moduli. For each casting geometry, three tests were performed; the data were found  to be highly repeatable as the curves were almost perfectly overlapped. 

a) 

 

b) 

13 Page 13 of 25

Figure 10. Temperature evolutions during cooling of the middle points of the bars: a) Geometry A, b) Geometry B 

For the stress release measurements, both the investigated part geometries were subjected to  EDM  wire  cuts.  In  the  case  of  the  Geometry  A,  on  both  the  side  bars,  a  displacement  of 

ip t

0.0650±1E‐4 mm was measured; in the case of the Geometry B, the displacement of the side  bars  was  much  less  (0.0100±1E‐4  mm),  highlighting  the  negligible  residual  stresses.  These 

cr

results  were  further  confirmed  using  a  Coordinate  Measurement  Machine  (resolution:  1E‐6 

us

mm). 

an

  3.3 Numerical evaluation of the residual stress state 

M

A  preliminary  thermal  analysis  was  conducted  aimed  at  approximating  the  experimental  temperature during cooling. The cooling phase was subdivided into two steps: cooling before 

d

the shake out (BSO) and cooling after the shake out (ASO). In the BSO phase, the step time was 

te

set to 4800s (the real time at which the shake‐out was performed); in the ASO phase, the step 

air). 

Ac ce p

time  was  set to  20000 s (the time the  casting needed to cool down to  room  temperature in 

Contrary to the conventional procedures reported in literature, only the casting geometry was  modelled,  while  the  “thermal  action”  of  the  sand  mould  was  taken  accounted  for  with  a  surrounding environment (sink) whose temperature law was implemented according to the  experimental data.  

For  the  thermal  analysis,  the  same  model  mesh  as  shown  in  Figure  6  was  adopted.  The  thermal symmetry condition was modelled by applying negligible heat fluxes to the symmetry  regions. To make the results of the inverse analysis more accurate, and considering that the  Heat  Transfer  Coefficients  (HTC)  are  influenced  by  several  parameters  (including  the  part  geometry),  the  casting  surface  was  divided  in  the  two  groups  characterised  by  its  own  HTC 

 

14 Page 14 of 25

values, as shown in Figure 11a. Group #1 contained the side bars, and Group #2 contained the 

us

cr

ip t

central bar and end mass region. 

 

 

b) 

an

a) 

Figure 11. a) Regions characterised by different HTC values, b) Temperature comparison after the inverse analysis 

M

Results of the temperature profile simulations during the BSO step are shown in Figure 11b; it  may be noted that a good agreement exists between the experimental and numerical results.  

d

The HTC values for both groups, which characterize the thermal  convection of the parts, are 

te

listed in Table 3 as a function of the temperature.   

Ac ce p

Table 3. Values of the HTCs which characterise the virtual convection between the casting and the sand mould 

  Temperature [°C] 

Group #1   HTC [W/mm2K] 

Group #2   HTC [W/mm2K] 

670 

3.50E‐05 

3.00E‐05 

1000 

1.00E‐04 

3.00E‐05 

1200 

1.80E‐04 

7.00E‐05 

1300 

1.80E‐04 

8.00E‐05 

  Simulation  results  were  analysed  in  terms  of  stress‐time  curves:  the  principal  stress  components  (maximum  and  minimum,  respectively  SMax  and  SMin  in  the  graphs)  and  the  longitudinal stress (red curve) on the middle point of both the central bar and one of the side 

 

15 Page 15 of 25

bars were monitored. The stress evolutions shown in Figure 12 were obtained using the FE 

cr

ip t

model that included the elasto‐plastic material model. 

 

us

 

b) 

c) 

te

d

M

an

a) 

 

 

d) 

Ac ce p

Figure 12. Residual stress state without creep modelling: a) max and min principal stress in the thinner bar, b)  longitudinal stress in the thinner bar, c) max and min principal stress in the n thicker bar, d) longitudinal stress in  the thicker bar. 

The  stress  evolutions,  considering  the  elasto‐visco‐plastic  constitutive  equation  (thus  implementing the above mentioned Norton’s law), are reported in Figure 13.  

 

16 Page 16 of 25

ip t cr b) 

M

an

us

a) 

 

 

d

c) 

d) 

te

Figure 13. Residual stress state considering creep behaviour: a) max and min principal stress in the thinner bar, b) 

Ac ce p

longitudinal stress in the thinner bar, c) max and min principal stress in the thinner bar, d) longitudinal stress in the  thicker bar. 

Finally the results of the displacements due to stress release were calculated by sequentially  removing the symmetry constraints on two side bars. Numerical values, both considering and  neglecting the creep behaviour, are listed together with the experimental results in Table 4.   Table 4. Comparison of numerical and experimental displacement due to stress release 

   

Geometry A   Displacement [mm] 

Geometry B   Displacement[mm] 

Experimental 

0.065 

0.010 

Numerical (Elasto‐Visco‐plastic) 

0.069 

0.017 

Numerical (Elasto‐plastic) 

0.143 

0.029 

 

 

17 Page 17 of 25

Table 4 also shows results concerning the second investigated part geometry (Geometry B in  Table 2).   

ip t

4.  Discussion of results 

cr

The numerical stress evolutions in Figure 12 (a, c) and Figure 13 (a, c) show that both bars are 

us

always characterised by a uniaxial state of stress. In the case of the model implementing the  elasto‐plastic material behaviour, the maximum principal stress in the thinner bar is always 

an

negligible at the end of the cooling phase (Figure 12a), thus demonstrating that the side bar is  subjected  to  a  compressive  residual  state  of  stress;  the  opposite  occurs  in  the  central  bar, 

M

where the minimum principal stress can be considered negligible (Figure 12c). In the case of  the  model  that  also  implemented  the  creep  behaviour  (stress  evolution  in  Figure  13),  the 

d

viscous  contribution  had  no  influence  on  the  type  (i.e.,  compressive  or  tensile)  of  the  final 

te

stress state. However, when comparing the residual stress at room temperature (see Figure  14) from the two models, it is important to highlight that the values of the stresses predicted 

Ac ce p

by  the  model  implementing  the elasto‐visco‐plastic  material behaviour are  noticeably lower  (about half).   

a) 

b) 

Figure 14. Comparison between results obtained using the Elasto­Visco­Plastic (EVP) and the Elasto­Plastic (EP)  material model: a) Side Bar, b) Central Bar 

 

18 Page 18 of 25

This result agrees with the creep curves shown in Figure 8b: at the temperature of 800°C, it is  evident that, despite the fact that the stress applied was lower than the correspondent yield  stress,  a  noticeable  strain  affects  the  specimen  after  800  s,  thus  demonstrating  that  viscous 

ip t

behaviour  plays  a  key  role,  particularly  at  temperatures  above  600°C.  Such  a  result  of  the  present research  agrees  well with  the main outcome of the work  by Thorborg et al. (2012), 

cr

who obtained a satisfactory agreement with the experimental measurements of the residual 

us

stresses only when implementing in the numerical model a strain rate sensitive formulation.  As  concerns  the  matching  between  numerical  and  experimental  values,  it  should  be 

an

highlighted that, if considering similar studies in literature, the results obtained in the present  work using the FE model including the creep behaviour can be considered in good agreement 

M

with  the  experimental  values  of  the  bar  displacement  after  releasing  the  stress  by  wire  cutting. For example, in the work by Motoyama et al. (2014), in which a case study similar to 

d

the one investigated in the present research was adopted, it is reported an error of about 14% 

te

in  the  stress  prediction  using  the  same  approach  for  the  stress  measurement  (strain  measurement  after  cutting)  but  a  standard  simulation  approach  based  on  the  modelling  of 

Ac ce p

both  the  casting  and  the  sand  mould.  Thorborg  et  al.  (2012)  adopted  the  same  simulation  approach; in addition, in this study a larger error (in the range 31%‐72%) characterised the  comparison between the compressive stress values predicted by the numerical model and the  stress  data  obtained  from  the  hole  drilling  method:  such  a  result  is  probably  due  to  the  adoption  of  such  measuring  technique,  which  limits  the  stress  information  to  the  external  region  of  the  cast  part,  very  near  to  the  surface.  In  the  present  work  the  numerical  results,  despite the lower accuracy in the modelling of the casting process (no sand mould), predicted  a  displacement of the side bars equal to 6.9 microns, while the correspondent experimental  measurement  was  6.5  microns,  thus  resulting  an  error  of  7.8%.  On  the  contrary,  neglecting 

 

19 Page 19 of 25

the  viscous  strain  leads  to  an  overestimation  (more  than  twofold)  of  the  bar  displacement,  due to the overestimation of the residual stress state.  Finally the robustness of the numerical model was confirmed by comparing the results from 

ip t

the second investigated part geometry. Numerical simulation implementing the elasto‐visco‐ plastic  material  behaviour  predicted  a  negligible  value  of  the  displacement  due  to  stress 

cr

release (0.017 mm), which was in good agreement with the experimental results. In the case 

us

of the FE model implementing only elasto‐plastic models, the error increased (up to 190%). 

an

  5.  Conclusions  

M

In this work, a novel methodology to numerically evaluate residual stresses is presented. The  key points of the proposed methodology for the investigation of the phenomenon of residual 

very small computational costs have been obtained replacing the sand mould modelling 

te



d

stresses are resumed in the following: 

Ac ce p

with a virtual convection that adopts the proper heat transfer coefficients calculated from  an inverse analysis;  •

neglecting the viscous strain leads to an overestimation (more than twofold) of the stress  level in the cast part after the cooling phase in the sand mould, thus highlighting the key  role  played  by  the  elasto‐visco‐plastic  material  behaviour  in  this  stage  of  the  casting  process; 



avoiding  the  sand  mould  modelling  does  not  substantially  affect  the  accuracy  of  the  numerical  model,  which  instead  can  be  very  accurate  if  proper  material  behaviour  is  implemented; 

 

20 Page 20 of 25



the methodology showed to be accurate and robust, as confirmed by the good agreement  between  the  numerical  and  experimental  values  of  the  bar  displacements  after  stress  release in both the investigated casting geometries. 

ip t

The  present  study,  based  on  a  numerical/experimental  approach,  allowed  to  validate,  on  a  benchmark cast part largely adopted in literature, the accuracy of the proposed methodology: 

cr

obtained results confirm the possibility to apply such a methodology to any type of cast alloy 

us

as well as to cast parts having more complex geometries. The relatively small computational  cost, combined with good quality of results, makes such a methodology a powerful tool which 

an

gives  the  technology  engineer  the  possibility  to  decide  about  the  need  of  further  heat  treatments on the cast part and/or to set properly the casting process parameters  affecting 

M

the temperature distribution and, in turn, the residual state of stress. In addition, numerical  results  from  the  simulation  can  be  used  for  subsequent  analyses  aimed  at  investigating 

 

Ac ce p

Acknowledgements 

te

d

further manufacturing processes and/or the real working conditions of the component. 

The  activities  in  this  work  were  funded  by  the  Italian  Government  in  the  framework  of  the  European  National  Operative  Programme  for  Research  and  Competitiveness  (project  acronym: SMATI).   

References  Anawa, E.M., Olabi, A.G., 2008. Control of welding residual stress for dissimilar laser welded  materials. J. Mater. Process. Techn. 204, 22‐33. 

 

21 Page 21 of 25

Arif, A.F.M., Yilbas, B.S., Abdul Aleem, B.J., 2009. Laser cutting of thick sheet metals: Residual  stress analysis. Opt. Laser Techn. 41, 224‐232.  Baghani, A., Davami, P., Varahram, N., Shabani, M.O., 2014. Investigation on the effect of mold 

ip t

constraints and cooling rate on residual stress during the sand‐casting process of 1086 steel 

cr

by employing a thermo – mechanical model. Metall. Mater. Trans. B 45, 1157‐1169. 

Chang, A., Dantzig, J., 2004. Improved sand surface element for residual stress determination. 

us

Appl. Math. Model 28, 533‐546. 

conditions. J. Mater. Process. Techn. 135, 30‐43. 

an

Fachinotti,  V.D.,  Cardona,  A.,  2003.  Constitutive  models  of  steel  under  continuous  casting 

M

Fackeldey,  M.,  Ludwig,  A.,  Sahm,  P.R.,  1996.  Coupled  modelling  of  the  solidification  process 

d

predicting temperature, stresses and microstructures. Comp. Mater. Sci. 7, 194‐199. 

te

García Navas, V., Gonzalo, O., Bengoetxea, I., 2012. Effect of cutting parameters in the surface 

Ac ce p

residual stresses generated by turning in AISI 4340 steel. Int. J. Mach. Tool & Manuf. 61, 48‐57.  Gustafsson,  E.,  Hofwing,  M.,  Strömberg,  N.,  2009.  Residual  Stresses  in  a  stress  lattice  –  Experiments and finite element simulations. J. Mater. Process. Techn. 209, pp. 4320‐4328.  Inoue, Y., Motoyama, Y., Takahashi, H., Shinji, K., Yoshida, M., 2013. Effect of sand mold models  on  the  simulated  mould  restraint  force  and  the  contraction  of  the  casting  during  cooling  in  green sand molds. J. Mater. Process. Techn. 213, 1157‐1165.  Kong, F., Ma,  J., Kovacevic, R., 2011. Numerical and experimental study of thermally induced  residual stress in the hybrid laser–GMA welding process. J. Mater. Process. Techn. 211, 1102‐ 1111. 

 

22 Page 22 of 25

Koric, S., Thomas, B.G., 2008. Thermo‐mechanical models of steel solidification based on two  elastic visco‐plastic constitutive laws. J. Mater. Process. Techn. 197, 408‐418.   Liu, B.C., Kang, J.W., Xiong, S.M., 2001. A study on the numerical simulation of thermal stress 

ip t

during the solidification of shaped castings. Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater. 2, 157‐164. 

cr

Mc Guire, M.F., 2008. Stainless Steel for Designer Engineering. ASM International, 91‐107. 

us

Metzeger,  D.,  Jarret  New,  K.,  Dantzig,  J.,  2001.  A  sand  surface  element  for  the  efficient  modelling of residual stress in castings. Appl. Math. Model. 25, 825‐842. 

an

Motoyama,  Y.,  Inoue,  Y.,  Saito,  G.,  Yoshida,  M.,  2013.  A  verification  of  the  thermal  stress  analysis including the furan sand mold, used to predict the thermal stress in castings. J. Mater. 

M

Process. Techn. 213, 2270‐2277. 

d

Motoyama, Y., Inukai, D., Okane, T., Yoshida, M., 2014. Verification of the Simulated Residual 

te

Stress in the Cross Section of Gray Cast Iron Stress Lattice Shape Casting via Thermal Stress 

Ac ce p

Analysis. Metall. Mater. Trans. A 45A, 2315‐2325.  Olabi,  A.G.,  Hashmi,  M.S.J.,  1998.  Effects  of  the  stress‐relief  conditions  on  a  martensite  stainless‐steel welded component. J. Mater. Process. Techn. 77, 216‐225.  Rossini,  N.S.,  Dassisti,  M.,  Benyounis,  K.Y.,  Olabi,  A.G.,  2012.  Methods  of  measuring  residual  stresses in components. Mater. & Design 35, 572‐588.  Si,  H.M.,  Cho,  C.,  Kwakh,  S.Y.,  2003.  A  hybrid  method  for  casting  process  simulation  by  combining FDM and FEM with an efficient data conversion algorithm. J. Mater. Process. Techn.  133, 311‐321.  Thorborg,  J.,  Klinkhammer,  J.,  Heitzer,  M,  2012.  Transient  and  residual  stresses  in  large  castings, taking time effects into account. IOP Conf. Ser.: Mater. Sci. Eng. 33.  

 

23 Page 23 of 25

Totten, G., Howes, M., Inoue, T., 2002. Handbook of residual stresses and deformation of steel. 

Ac ce p

te

d

M

an

us

cr

ip t

ASM International, 361‐371. 

 

20

24 Page 24 of 25

Highlights    • Residual stress evaluated differently from the approaches reported in literature  

ip t

• Residual stress evaluated differently from actual commercial codes for casting 

cr

• Thermo mechanical FE model implementing HTCs by inverse analysis and tensile/creep data 

us

• Replacing the sand mould with virtual convection negligibly affect the model accuracy  

an

• The creep behaviour shows to be the most influencing factor affecting residual stresses  • Good agreement between experimental and numerical displacements after the stress release 

M

• The proposed methodology is robust (validated using two casting geometries) 

Ac ce p

te

d

 

 

25 Page 25 of 25