Molecular Neurobiology

Molecular Neurobiology

I . . . . . . . . . Molecular Neurobiology edited by D. M. Glover and B. D. Hames, IRL Press, 1988. £25.00 (xi + 203 pages) ISBN 0 19 963042 9 In hi...

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I . . . . . . . . .

Molecular Neurobiology edited by D. M. Glover and B. D. Hames, IRL Press, 1988. £25.00 (xi + 203 pages) ISBN 0 19 963042 9

In his introduction to this book, Eric Barnard proposes 'an agenda' for the application of molecular biology to neuroscience. In this agenda he describes in outline what impact he feels the application of the tools of molecular biology will have on neuroscience. He claims, and I would agree, that the techniques of molecular biology will be of major importance in nearly all fields of neuroscience, from receptor pharmacology to human genetics, and from developmental neuroscience to neurodegeneration. With this background, I found it initially disappointing

that the field encompassed by the book is so narrow. There are only three substantive chapters - one from Ganetzky and Wu on the localization of 'neurological' mutations in Drosophila, one from Claudio on receptor strucIture and one from Covault on cell adhesion molecules and neural development. The editors justify this limited selection on the grounds that they feel it is better to cover a few topics in some depth than to attempt a broad coverage superficially. Having read the book, I am inclined to agree with their view. As an interested outsider, I found all three chapters well written, clearly illustrated and extremely informative; the book is clearly aimed at interested outsiders like myself, who are working in other areas of neuroscience. I shall use

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the book to prepare my neuroscience teaching lectures next year. I would doubt that Drosophila geneticists, receptor pharmacologists or developmental neurobiologists would learn anything new about their own fields from this book because of the rather long delay (nearly two years) from article submission to publication. However, even they should find the book of use as a reference source. I like the book and would recommend it to anyone with a general interest in future directions for the neurosciences. I hope that these editors, or others, will consider producing other books in a similar format so that other areas of molecular neuroscience outlined in Eric Barnard's agenda can also be covered.

nals; therapeutic agents accessing neurologists and to the general this action of 5-HT must be pre- practitioner, to physiologists and sumed to cross the blood-brain pharmacologists and to all those edited by /vlerton Sandier and barrier. (3) It could act as a trig- interested in the nervous system. Geralyn Collins, Oxford University gering agent to nociceptive affer- Migraine sufferers may feel at Press, 1990. £35.00 (xiii + 322 ent endings; 5-HT receptors on times, when reading the text, that pages) ISBN 0 19 261810 5 afferent neurones tend to be the debate has achieved a theo5-HT3 receptors so it is presumed logical complexity; nevertheless, Migraine headache may rep- that 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, the book repays careful reading. resent a single disease entity, or sometimes efficacious in migraine It exemplifies, as well as any its many manifestations, classical treatment, act here. volume devoted to a complex and and common migraine, cluster Current questions from the disabling condition, the dichotheadache, stress headache and so field of migraine research are omy between the approach of on, may have different underlying given a thorough airing through the physician wishing to see the pathologies. Migraine is difficult the presentations and discussions patient 'whole' and understand for the experimenter to get to of 49 experts who took part in a his spectrum of symptoms, and grips with because there are no 'Migraine Workshop' in Leeds that of researchers who feel there animal models. One aspect that Castle, Maidstone, UK in 1988. ought to be a simple causal this book highlights is the poten- The book is a comprehensive mechanism for migraine that tially key role of the amine, 5- introduction and explores in will be susceptible to a drug hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). How- depth some of the unresolved company's magic bullet. ever, whether depletion of 5-HT issues. It will be of interest to from platelets or from nerve endings is a principal causal factor of migraine or whether, alternatively, release of the amine is a TINS precipitating factor remains one of the unresolved questions. There are several postulated roles Most of the articles published in Trends in Neurosciences for 5-HT in migraine. (1) It may are specially invited by the editor. However, unsolicited have vasoconstrictor action on articles will also be considered for publication. All articles cranial arteriovenous shunt vessels; the Glaxo drug GR43175, go through a process of peer review. If you wish to write successfully used for the acute for TINS, please contact the editor, or a member of the treatment of migraine, is thought Editorial Advisory Board first, with an outline of your to mimic this action. (2) 5-HT intended article. may act as a neurotransmitter in pathways modulating pain sig-

Migraine: A Spectrum of Ideas

books John Hardy Alzheimer's Disease ResearchGroup, Departmentof Biochemistryand MolecularGenetics, StMary'sHospital MedicalSchool, NorfolkPlace, London W21PG,UK.

D. L Walli$ Departmentof Physiology,University of WalesCollegeof Cardiff, POBox902, CardiffCFl 1SS,UK.

Writing for

TINS, Vol. 13, No. 12, 1990

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