MON-P168: The Relationship Between Diet Quality and Life Quality in Adults

MON-P168: The Relationship Between Diet Quality and Life Quality in Adults

S240 MON-P166 DISEASE-RELATED MALNUTRITION AT ADMISSION IN A THIRD LEVEL HOSPITAL: BEYOND 10000 SCREENED PATIENTS M. Comas Martínez1 *, H. Segurola1, ...

57KB Sizes 38 Downloads 41 Views

S240 MON-P166 DISEASE-RELATED MALNUTRITION AT ADMISSION IN A THIRD LEVEL HOSPITAL: BEYOND 10000 SCREENED PATIENTS M. Comas Martínez1 *, H. Segurola1, V. Avilés1, A. Sancho1, G. Cárdenas1, B. Sarto1, M. Giribés1, M. Guerrero1, C. Puiggrós1, R. Burgos1. 1Nutritional Support Unit, University Hospital Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain Rationale: Disease-related malnutrition (DRM) is highly prevalent at hospital admission, and impacts negatively in the outcome of the patient. To analyze the impact of malnutrition in the outcome of patients admitted to a third level hospital after implementing a nutritional risk screening method at hospital admission. Methods: In 2013, a nutritional intervention protocol was started, including detection of nutritional risk through Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS-2002), followed by nutritional evaluation and nutritional plan. Results: Since 2013, 10089 patients have been screened, of whom 23.8% presents risk of malnutrition at admission. After nutritional assessment, 52% of the patients were identified as malnourished and required nutritional intervention: diet adaptation in 54.2%, 36.7% also needed oral nutritional supplementation, 3.8% required enteral nutrition and 5.3% parenteral nutrition. The mean hospital stay was 16.64 days in malnourished patients. Patients without nutritional risk had an average hospital stay of 10.97 days. ( p < 0.0001) Malnourished patients presented a high mortality rate (8.2% VS 2.7% in non-malnourished patients), and also a high need for a convalescent center (13.45% VS 7.26% ( p < 0.0001)) Conclusion: The DRM prevalence is very similar to that reported in literature, highlighting a greater mortality rate and a higher need for a convalescent center. We need to implement nutritional strategies to address DRM in the community setting. Disclosure of Interest: None declared.

MON-P167 INFLUENCE OF MALNUTRITION ON MORTALITY IN HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS M. Wäsch1, M. Plauth1 *. 1Dessau Community Hospital, DessauRoßlau, Germany Rationale: Hospital malnutrition is an often underestimated problem in the Industrial countries causing increased morbidity and mortality for patients as well as considerable additional cost for the health care system. For the detection of the malnutrition, various screening and assessment tools are recommended. The aim of this study was to examine whether hospital patients classified as malnourished according to either SGA category B and C or phase angle (PA) <5th percentile had an increased mortality risk according to the Pandora score. Methods: Of 353/358 consecutive patients admitted to the gastroenterology ward of Dessau community hospital in the period 15.02–24.04.2016 were screened for malnutrition using NRS-2002. 191/353 patients had a score of ≥ 3. In 150/191 patients the full data set including Pandora score, SGA classification, PA from bioelectric impedance analysis was available for analysis.

Poster Results: Malnourished patients showed a significantly higher mortality risk. Compared to 31 well nourished patients (SGA A) 119 malnourished patients (SGA B and C) showed a fourfold higher 30-day mortality risk (9.4 8.7% vs. 2.3 2.3%; p < 0.001). Using PA <5th percentile as criterion for malnutrition the mortality risk was of the same magnitude in 103 patients and significantly higher than in the well nourished group (9.8 9.1% vs 3.8 3.9%; p < 0.001). Using either NRS ≥ 3 and SGA B and C or NRS ≥ 3 and PA <5th percentile as criterion the prevalence of malnutrition was 33% and 29% in excellent agreement with published data. Conclusion: SGA as a subjective and PA as an objective method are equally well suited to identify patients at increased risk of malnutrition related mortality. Disclosure of Interest: None declared.

MON-P168 THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DIET QUALITY AND LIFE QUALITY IN ADULTS M. A. Sahin1 *, Z. Buyuktuncer1. 1Nutrition and Dietetics, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey Rationale: Diet quality has a potential to influence the quality of life. However, little is known about the relationship between diet quality and life quality. This study aimed to determine the relationship between diet quality and life quality in an adult population. Methods: The study was conducted on 1,181 individuals, aged 19 to 65 years who were admitted to 19 Family Health Centers in Edirne, Turkey. General characteristics, anthropometrical measurements and physical activity data of individuals were recorded. Food frequency questionnaire was used to determine diet quality; and Short Form-36 life quality questionnaire was used to determine the life quality. Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005) scores of individuals were calculated, and then classified into three groups: good (over 80 points), moderate (between 51 and 80 points), and poor (50 and under points). Short Form-36 life quality questionnaire was used to calculate mental components score and physical components score. Results: The mean of Healthy Eating Score was 58.3 for males, 63.8 for females. A strong relationship between diet quality and life quality was shown in this study. The diet quality score was significantly associated with mental components score ( p < 0.01). Moreover, individuals had low scores for consumption of total vegetables, whole grains and dairy products, and intake of sodium whereas high scores for consumption of total grains, meats and legumes and intake of saturated fat. Conclusion: Improving the life quality of populations is one of the main goals of public health strategies. This study showed that improving diet quality can help improving society’s life quality. Encouraging people for increasing their vegetable, grain and dairy consumption, and decreasing salt intake should be prior foresight to improve diet quality of people living in Edirne. References: Disclosure of Interest: None declared.