Neuro-ophthalmology review manual, revised 5th edition

Neuro-ophthalmology review manual, revised 5th edition

Book Reviews Edited by David K. Coats, MD Handbook of Neuro-Ophthalmology and Orbital Disease Diagnosis and Treatment, 2nd Edition Robert L. Tomsak an...

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Book Reviews Edited by David K. Coats, MD Handbook of Neuro-Ophthalmology and Orbital Disease Diagnosis and Treatment, 2nd Edition Robert L. Tomsak and Mark R. Levine. Butterworth-Heinemann, Philadelphia; 2004. 175 pages $39.95 USD ISBN 0-7506-7417-2 Media type: Textbook Reviewed by Joel M. Weinstein, MD; Madison, WI Synopsis: Handbook of Neuro-ophthalmology and Orbital Disease provides a clear, succinct, and extremely practical approach to the diagnosis and management of the vast majority of neuroophthalmologic and orbital problems. The text is very well referenced, providing a guide to original source material for readers requiring more detail on various clinical issues. Target Audience: Practicing ophthalmologists and ophthalmology residents and fellows. The second edition of this book includes an update of the original seventeen chapters of the first edition, as well as a new five-chapter section on orbital diseases written by Dr. Levine. The book is jointly written by a neuro-ophthalmologist (Dr. Tomsak) and an oculoplastic/orbital surgeon (Dr. Levine). This collaboration results in a unique perspective on both subjects. The primary focus of the book is neuroophthalmology, and much of the material in the orbital chapters nicely complements the larger neuroophthalmology section. However the orbital section also contains chapters on lacrimal gland tumors and on malignant eyelid lesions. The book is not meant to be an exhaustive survey of these two disciplines. Instead, it highlights topics that are frequently encountered by most ophthalmologists, with the goal of providing practical guidelines that will assist practicing clinicians dealing with “bread and butter” neuro-ophthalmologic and orbital problems. To this end, the book includes individual chapters on the approach to everyday topics such as diplopia, headache, transient visual loss, and ptosis. The text emphasizes information that will be directly applicable to daily clinical practice. There are also individual chapters on the more “common” neuroophthalmologic diseases, such as optic neuritis, thyroid eye disease, and giant cell arteritis. These diseases were selected, the authors indicate, because the well-informed clinician can make a major difference in the patient’s clinical outcome. The information on each of these topics is up to date and the discussions cover all major issues in diagnosis and management. While the authors do not attempt to provide an exhaustive survey of each disorder, the book is extremely well referenced, providing a guide to original source material when needed. One of the most reader-friendly features of the book is its thoughtful use of tables to recap some of the major clinical points, e.g. “Prism prescribing tips,” and “Types and possible causes of proptosis.” The book has an ample set of well-chosen black and white. The book fulfills its goal of providing a readable guidebook that can be, as suggested in the preface to the first edition, “taken into the trenches”. It is highly readable and will provide a useful guidebook for both residents and practicing ophthalmologists. The book would also be useful for neurologists at all levels. Neuro-Ophthalmology Review Manual, Revised 5th Edition Lanning B. Kline and Frank J. Bajandas. Slack Incorporated: Thorofare, NJ; 2004. 288 pages $44.95 USD ISBN 1-55642-672-0 Media type: Review Manual Reviewed by Nancy J. Newman, MD; Atlanta, GA

Synopsis: A small, paperback review manual that concisely and accurately lays out the basics of neuroophthalmology. Target Audience: Medical students, residents, fellows, general ophthalmologists, neurologists and neurosurgeons. Neuro-ophthalmology is complicated. Most medical students don’t get it and residents, especially ophthalmology residents, may even fear it. There is an obvious niche for a small, paperback review manual that concisely and accurately lays out the basics. This book continues to fill that niche. The primary author of this manual, Lanning Kline, is a seasoned neuro-ophthalmologist with many years of practice as a clinician, educator, and chairman of a department of ophthalmology. There are a few other contributing authors. This edition of the manual follows the prior editions in its organization of chapters. Although no new chapters have been added, various subjects have been updated and clarified, including management guidelines for the patient with a third nerve palsy, an algorithm for the approach to the patient with anisocoria, and a guide to the new treatments of multiple sclerosis. The style continues to be telegraphic, in outline form, emphasizing the role of this book as a true review manual, rather than a primary text. The references have been nicely updated throughout, with a good balance of the classics and groundbreaking news. A minor criticism is the organization of the chapters with the afferent and efferent systems intermixed somewhat arbitrarily. A suggestion for the next edition would be the incorporation of automated perimetry printouts in the chapter on visual field analysis, especially in the quiz at the end of the chapter. The niche is still there – one only has to look at the previous edition of this manual on our shelf in the residents’ library with its dog-eared pages and spine retaped four times because of use. This book will be used by medical students, residents, fellows, general ophthalmologists, neurologists and neurosurgeons, and even neuro-ophthalmologists looking for a better way of teaching the nuts and bolts of neuroophthalmology. This manual remains true to its goal to be“ a readable compendium of ‘no-nonsense’ neuro-ophthalmology.” Immunology of Behc¸et’s Disease Manfred Zierhut and Shigeaki Ohno. Swets & Zeitlinger: Lisee, The Netherlands; 2003. 178 pages $89.00 USD ISBN 90 265 1960 5 Media type: Textbook Reviewed by Kenneth T. Calamia, MD; Jacksonville, FL Synopsis: A clearly written review of the directions of research into the pathogenesis of Behc¸ et’s disease, providing the rational for new and future treatment. Target Audience: Ophthalmologists, rheumatologists, and immunologists The title of this book does not reflect the diverse aspects of Behc¸ et’s disease presented. Twenty short, concise, and readable chapters written by a multinational group of experts address the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of the disorder as well as its immunology. The editors are recognized leaders in the field of uveitis, both in the clinic and laboratory. The understanding of Behc¸ et’s disease is a work in progress. The reader has the opportunity to enjoy investigating the immunopathogenesis of the disease, including chapters on potential triggering infectious agents, cytokines, immune cells, and immunogenetics. While far from completely understood, the book presents a convergence that relates the genetics, infectious agents, neutrophil hyperactivity, and autoimmunity, all likely playing a role in pathogenesis. Other immune mediated inflammatory diseases may share in some of these mechanisms. The ocular manifestations of Behc¸ et’s disease are well described. The chronic, relapsing course leading to visual loss is emphasized, underscoring the need for early diagnosis and aggressive treatment. A high index of suspicion for the disease is particularly important in the US where the disease is rare. There is no clear treatment consensus, and treatment failures are common. However, several potential new treatment targets can now be recognized, and the very promising preliminary results of two new agents, interferon␣ and infliximab, an anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody, are reviewed. There are no controlled trials of anti-TNF treatment of uveitis, but results of open trials of these agents from Turkey and Greece