No. 192 Effects of Exercise Training on Renal Function in Salt-Sensitive Hypertensive Rats

No. 192 Effects of Exercise Training on Renal Function in Salt-Sensitive Hypertensive Rats

S132 participants that performed exercise with music was compared with the control group that performed exercise without music. The exercise classes ...

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S132

participants that performed exercise with music was compared with the control group that performed exercise without music. The exercise classes were held 11 times (i.e. once a week for a 3-month period). The self-efficacy for exercise scale was used to assess an individual’s confidence in their ability to continue exercising before initiating and immediately after finishing the 3-month exercise program between the two groups. Results: The self-efficacy for exercise was significantly higher in the intervention group than the control group after the 3-month intervention (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Music selected by participants can promote selfefficacy for exercise in care preventive exercise. These results suggest the possibility that music contributes to the continuation of exercise for care prevention in elderly people. Additional research is required to confirm these observations. No. 192 Effects of Exercise Training on Renal Function in Salt-Sensitive Hypertensive Rats. Yoshiko Sakata; Osamu Ito, MD Phd; Akihiro Sakuyama; Masahiro Kohzuki. Disclosure: None. Objective: Exercise training (EX) is well known as an effective therapy for hypertension. However little has been reported on effects of EX on salt-sensitive hypertension and concomitant renal disorder. We investigated effects of EX on blood pressure and renal function in saltsensitive hypertension. Design: Basic research. Setting: High salt diet and EX with treadmill. Participants: Six-week-old male Dahl salt-sensitive (DAHL-S) rats were divided into four groups: 1) normal salt diet (NS) group (NS-SED n¼10), 2) NS plus EX group (NS-EX n¼10), 3) high salt diet (HS) group (HS-SED n¼11), 4) HS plus EX group (HS-EX n¼11). Interventions: NS and HS groups were fed with diet containing 0.6% and 8% NaCl, respectively. EX groups underwent treadmill running for eight weeks. Main Outcome Measures: Blood pressure, renal function histology and oxidative stress. Level of Evidence: Level 1 (likely reliable). Results: HS induced severe hypertension, massive proteinuria, renal dysfunction, and glomerulosclerosis. Although EX did not change blood pressure and plasma creatinine levels, EX significantly improved proteinuria, creatinine clearance, and glomerulosclerosis. HS markedly increased urinary thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) an index of oxidative stress, but EX significantly decreased urinary TBARS; there was no significant difference in plasma TBARS among all groups. EX significantly decreased HS-stimulated xanthine oxidoreductase activity but not NADPH oxidase activity in the kidney. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that EX improves HS-induced renal disorder independently of blood pressure in DAHL-S rats. The improvement of oxidative stress in the kidneys may be involved in the renoprotective effects of EX. Thus EX may be an effective therapeutic approach for preventing the development of renal disorders in salt-sensitive hypertension. No. 193 Effects of Exercise Training on Renin-Angiotensin System in the Kidney of Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats. Akihiro Sakuyama; Osamu Ito, MD PHd; Yoshiko Sakata; Masahiro Kohzuki. Disclosure: None. Objective: Exercise training (EX) has anti-hypertensive and renal protective effects. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in the regulation of blood pressure and renal function. In this study we investigated the effects of the EX on renal RAS in Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Design: Basic research. Setting: Treadmill EX. Participants: Six-weekold male Dahl salt-sensitive rats were divided into four groups: 1) normal salt diet (NS); 2) NS þ EX; 3) high salt diet (HS); 4) HSþ EX. Intervention: NS or HS groups were fed diet containing 0.6% or 8% NaCl. Treadmill running was performed in EX groups for 8 weeks (5 days/week; 60 min/day at 16-20 m/min 0 % grade). Main Outcome Measures: Blood pressure, renal function, and histology and protein expressions of RAS components in renal cortex and medulla. Level of Evidence: Level 1 (likely reliable). Results: HS significantly elevated systolic blood pressure, and EX did not change. HS significantly decreased creatinine clearance, but EX significantly improved. HS induced kidney weight gain and glomerular

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sclerosis, but EX suppressed them. HS increased angiotensinogen expressions and decreased renin expressions in the cortex and medulla. HS increased angiotensin II type 1 (at1) receptor expression in the medulla and MAS receptor expression in the cortex but decreased angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor expressions in the cortex and medulla. EX improved HS-increased angiotensinogen and AT1 receptor expressions only in the medulla. EX improved HS-decreased renin expressions in the cortex and medulla and HS-decreased AT2 and MAS receptor expressions only in the medulla. Conclusions: EX improves HS-induced renal damage with changes of RAS component in the blood pressure-independent manner. These results suggest that EX may have beneficial effects in HS-induced renal damage. No. 194 Circulatory Physiological Change in Scuba Diving Preliminary Report: Effect of Deep Breathing. Chiho Sasaki; Takashiisaji, MD PhD; Masayoshi Yamamoto; Yuji Hondamd (Teikyo University School of Medicine Department of Rehabilitation Medicine). Disclosure: None. Objectives: To know the influences of different type of breathing on the circulatory physiological index in scuba diving (SD) in order to refer to the disabled with restrictive ventilatory dysfunction. Design: Preliminary cross-sectional study. Setting: Real recreational SD and daily living around SD participant: a 42-year-old healthy female standard diver. Interventions: After the portable Holter recorder was put on the body electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure (BP), and oxygen saturation (SPO2) were recorded during 3 SDs performed by wearing special dry suit for waterproofing. Each SD (20m/40 minutes) was performed by boat entry in the sea of Okinawa, Japan. 1st SD was performed with deep abdominal breathing (DB), 2nd and 3rd SD with usual breathing (UB) as control data on the other day. 1st SD was also compared of those data in the usual daily living followed by the SDs. Main Outcome Measures: Heart rate (HR), BP, and SPO2. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Average HR (81 bpm), systolic BP (124 mmHg), and SPO2 (97.17%) during DB are all significantly lower than average HR (101), systolic BP (162), and SPO2 (97.4) during UP. Basic data recorded in the usual daily living were as follows: average HR, 74 bpm; systolic BP, 124 mmHg; and SPO2, 97.4%. There was no significant difference between systolic BP during DB and that (124) in the usual daily living. Conclusions: It might be possible that deep breathing suppress the extraordinary change of HR and BP during SD. Reprinted with permission. No. 195 Rehabilitation for Extensive Burns. Hiroshi Sato; Hideki Yumikake; Shiro Hanakawa; Naoya Kobayashi. Objective: Here we treated skin contraction and restricted joint range of motion (ROM) which were caused by thickened scar after skin grafting for extensive burns depending on wound healing process. We report favorable results obtained by minimizing functional disorders and activities of daily living (ADL) disorders. Setting: A rehabilitation center of the 119-bed general hospital in Japan. Participants: A housewife in her 80s with good premorbid ADL sustained extensive burns to both thighs as well as the right hip, left back (third degree 21%), and right hand (second degree 1%) when her clothes caught fire during a controlled field burning. Burns covered 22% of her body; the burn index was 21.5, and the prognostic burn index was 103.5. Interventions: The patient received tailored multifaceted rehabilitation including joint ROM, muscle strength maintenance and systemic adjustment trainings depending on wound healing process. Main Outcome Measures: Changes in hematological data, joint ROM, functional independence measure (FIM) and motion morphology were examined by dividing the wound healing process into stages 1 to 4. Results: Hemoglobin 9.4 ? 9.7 g/dl hematocrit 29.2 ? 30.2% and albumin 2.0 ? 3.3 g/dl; joint rom: right hip flexion 80 ? 110 right knee flexion 80 ? 110 and right ankle dorsiflexion ?5 ? 10 ; FIM 60 ? 120 points; gatch up sitting posture 50 ? Admitted to a nursing facility for continued ADL training; able to walk with a t-cane. Assessment: Providing appropriate