Ocular Complications of Immunosuppressive Therapy in Renal Transplant Recipients

Ocular Complications of Immunosuppressive Therapy in Renal Transplant Recipients

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 864 most reproducible pictures. Pupil size of at least 7 mm and X5 magnification with low ASA (25) rated film gave...

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AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY

864

most reproducible pictures. Pupil size of at least 7 mm and X5 magnification with low ASA (25) rated film gave superior re­ sults. The Polaroid camera produced color prints of the disk by setting the flash to high intensity, plugging the flash from the unit into the Polaroid, setting the Zeiss ocular at — 1, setting the Polaroid focus for the shortest distance and after the Po­ laroid objective was placed into contact with the Zeiss ocular by triggering the shut­ ter. Photography is a practical clinical tool for assessing the state of health of the optic disk. OCULAR PRESSIVE

COMPLICATIONS OF THERAPY PLANT

IN

IMMUNOSUP-

RENAL

TRANS­

RECIPIENTS

C. J. Pavlin, G. DeVeber and L. Chisholm (Toronto) In a group of 62 renal transplant pa­ tients examined for evidence of ocular com­ plications cataracts were the major compli­ cation observed, present in 29 (46.7%). Statistical analysis revealed a significant re­ lationship ( P = <.01) between cataracts and total dose of prednisone received, total number of days in which dosage exceeded 100 mg, and the number of rejection crises requiring high corticosteroid dosage. Ocu­ lar hypertension was an uncommon com­ plication in our study. ENERGY. A USEFUL CRITERION IN H U M A N VISUAL-EVOKED RESPONSE ANALYSIS

L. F. Siebert and J. A. Parker (Toronto) In this study, visual-evoked response waveforms were obtained from seven nor­ mal and 14 abnormal subjects in a clinical setting using a diffuse xenon flash and sig­ nal averaging computer. Amplitude and la­ tency measurements were then compared with an energy function calculated as the area beneath a curve of the VER voltage squared vs. time for the interval 0 to 125 msec. The energy function proved to be su­ perior to latency, which was in turn better than amplitude for detecting asymmetry be­

NOVEMBER, 1974

tween eyes of the abnormal subjects. For those subjects with bilateral, symmetrical disease, both eriergy and latency measures identified a group which was significantly different than the normal population. Therefore, the energy function was a most useful addition to latency and ampli­ tude measurements in detecting the pres­ ence of disease in the visual pathway. HUMAN

NIGHT VISION

P. E. Hallett (Toronto) At low levels when quantum absorptions are scarce light is extensively integrated over space and time, yet when the darkadapted eye is illuminated by a brief flash fine details can be seen. Threshold' experi­ ments, using test flashes presented at the same time as a brief weak background flash, show reduced spatial integration and various other effects (Crawford-Westheimer experiment, threshold overshoot at edges) that are widely interpreted as revealing the interaction of excitatory and inhibitory pro­ cesses with different temporal and spatial characteristics. Thus dark-adapted vision is not a special case—the mechanisms that are associated with the higher resolution of the light-adapted state (e.g., lateral inhibition) already exist in the dark-adapted state, or else can be activated within milliseconds. A

STUDY OF CELLULAR

IMMUNITY

IN

RABBITS HAVING XENOGENEIC CORNEAL GRAFTS

H. S. Wang and P. K. Basu (Toronto) The objective of the study was to deter­ mine whether a small orthotopic corneal xenograft in the rabbit could sensitize the host systemically. Ten rabbits were grafted with interlamellar bovine cornea (4 mm in diameter and 0.3 mm thick). Pre- and postoperative blood samples were obtained at frequent in­ tervals. These were tested by H 3 -thymidine incorporation test (micro method). On three randomly selected animals the leukocyte mi­ gration inhibition test was applied. A skin