P224 Heat Pain Threshold increases after dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DL) rTMS, but not after stimulation at other sites

P224 Heat Pain Threshold increases after dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DL) rTMS, but not after stimulation at other sites

e124 Abstracts / Clinical Neurophysiology 128 (2017) e1–e163 Figure 2. institutions. The factors underlying the lack of test–retest reproducibility...

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e124

Abstracts / Clinical Neurophysiology 128 (2017) e1–e163

Figure 2.

institutions. The factors underlying the lack of test–retest reproducibility of the interference should be further investigated. doi:10.1016/j.clinph.2016.10.340

P224 Heat Pain Threshold increases after dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DL) rTMS, but not after stimulation at other sites—A.-C. Schmid a,b,c,*, J.-H. Chien b, C.-C. Liu b, J.D. Greenspan c, F.A. Lenz b (a University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Brain Imaging and NeuroStimulation Lab, Hamburg, Germany , b Johns Hopkins University, Department of Neurosurgery, Baltimore, United States, c University of Maryland, Department of Neural and Pain Sciences, Baltimore, United States) ⇑

Corresponding author.

Introduction: There is accumulating evidence that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) induces analgesic effects undergoing experimentally induced pain. While the motor cortex (M1) is the most widely used cortical target for TMS, also dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DL) is targeted fairly regularly. As the medial prefrontal cortex (MF) also plays a role in the experience of pain, we investigated the analgesic effects of these three stimulation locations as well as a sham stimulation. Methods: 16 healthy participants age 23–66 (6 females) underwent a sham-controlled, within-subject, cross-over design including

4 different stimulation sessions. We assessed the effects of 10 Hz neuronavigated rTMS of 4 different stimulation sites on four thermal thresholds. Warmth detection (WDT), cold detection (CDT), heat pain (HPT) and cold pain (CPT) threshold were assessed before and after stimulation. The results for each stimulation site were sham corrected. Results: Sham corrected, HPT differed between baseline and post stimulation in DL, but not in any other stimulation location. The other thresholds (WDT, CDT, CPT) were not changed to a statistically significant degree by stimulation at any site. Discussion: Our preliminary results suggest that stimulation of DL, but not of M1 or MF, results in higher heat pain thresholds compared to sham stimulation. This is consistent with the study of Borckard et al. (2007), who found higher HPTs after 10 Hz DL rTMS. However we did not find so far an effect of M1 stimulation as Nahmias et al. (2009) had shown. We had expected to find an increase in pain thresholds which did not occur after MF stimulation. No effects of the stimulation were found on detection thresholds as had been shown in other studies. This suggests a specific influence of 10 Hz rTMS over DL on pain, but not on sensory thresholds. doi:10.1016/j.clinph.2016.10.341

P225 Dissecting the sense of agency by targeted low-frequency rTMS— T. Popa a,*, R. Hunt a,b, N. Pasternack a,c, M. Hallett a, S. Meunier a,d (a NINDS, NIH, Human Motor Control Section, Bethesda, MD,