Relationship between Childhood Food Allergies and Family Quality of Life

Relationship between Childhood Food Allergies and Family Quality of Life

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 19 Poster Session: Professional Skills; Nutrition Assessment; Medical Nutrition Therapy Hospital Interdisciplinary Collaboration in a...

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 19

Poster Session: Professional Skills; Nutrition Assessment; Medical Nutrition Therapy Hospital Interdisciplinary Collaboration in a Multivitamin Improvement Project

The Effect of Low Sodium Diet Education in the Prevention of Hospital Readmission for Heart Failure Patients Author(s): L.T. Doxtater1, D.K. Tidwell2, R.D. Williams3, S.L. Burney4; 1Baptist Memorial Hospital-Desoto, Southaven, MS, 2Food Science, Nutrition, & Health Promotion, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, 3 Health & Human Performance, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, 4 Mississippi State Department of Health, Greenwood, MS Learning Outcome: Describe the effect of low sodium diet education on 30 and 45-day readmission rates for heart failure. Heart failure (HF) costs the United States billions of dollars in health care services and lost productivity each year. Readmission rates of HF patients are being used as an indicator of the quality and efficiency of care. Even though there is no consensus on the optimal level of dietary sodium restriction, a low sodium diet is a component of the accepted treatment for managing chronic HF. Non-compliance with dietary sodium and fluid restriction is among the most common precipitating factors of HF exacerbation. Analysis of the effect of low sodium diet education on hospital readmission at 30 and 45 days post discharge of patients (N¼52) diagnosed with HF was conducted. Chi-square analysis determined that low sodium diet education did not affect readmittance within 30 days (c2 ¼ 2.142, P ¼ .143) or 45 days (c2 ¼ 0.514, P ¼ .474). However, t-tests determined that patients readmitted within 30 days post discharge were older with a mean age of 81.5 years versus 72.6 years for those not readmitted within 30 days (P ¼ .005). Men were more likely to be readmitted than women within 30 days (P ¼ .021) and 45 days (P ¼ .019). Higher N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels were also observed in individuals who were readmitted within 30 days (P ¼ .011) and 45 days (P ¼ .010). While low sodium diet education did not affect readmission, older age, male sex, and higher NT-proBNP values increased the rate of readmission. Funding Disclosure: None

Author(s): L. Seals, T. O’Flaherty, E. Heidrich; Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH Learning Outcome: Describe an interdisciplinary collaborative project which resulted in improved MVI selections within a pediatric hospital formulary. Background: The purpose of this project was to simplify a pediatric hospital formulary of multivitamin (MVI )products for the general pediatric population; to improve safety by reducing confusion/errors in ordering and dispensing; to decrease costs by reducing the number of products carried in the pharmacy; and to assure consistent vitamin/nutrient content for patients. Methods: Registered Dietitians reviewed all MVI products for content, formulation, and appropriateness for their general patient populations. Final MVI selections were made based on availability, nutrient content, and with price considerations. These selections were presented and approved by hospital committees; The Nutrition Support Committee as well as Pharmacy and Therapeutic Committee. Multivitamin selections in Epic were updated and together the Registered Dietitians and Pharmacists created a new MVI Order Set in Epic to reflect the formulary choices. Results: The new MVI orderset in EPIC resulted in fewer MVI products, which were reduced by half. There has been more consistency in ordering of vitamin products, with fewer chances for errors in dispensing. An educational module was created and approved for Nurse Practitioners, Registered Dietitians, Pharmacists, and medical residents. It was presented to hospital medical Residents at their noon conference, the APRN Education Council ,and at an Advanced Pharmacy Series for Prescribers. Conclusion: Review of MVI use following completion of the education module showed improved confidence in the quality of the MVI, ease of ordering, and improved workflow. Funding Disclosure: None

Relationship between Childhood Food Allergies and Family Quality of Life 1

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Author(s): A. Colvin , T. Crook , L. Christie , D. Gonzales , J. Phelps , L. Maddox , R. Hakkak1; 1Dietetics and Nutrition, Univ. of Arkansas for Med. Sci., Little Rock, AR, 2Arkansas Children’s Hosp., Little Rock, AR Learning Outcome: To describe the impact of childhood food allergies on family quality of life. Food allergies are increasing and family quality of life (QOL) may be negatively impacted in households with food allergic children. The Food Allergy Impact Scale (FAIS) was administered to 39 participants and provided a measure of QOL in eight domains as well as an overall score. Participants were parents of children with food allergies in Arkansas and Missouri. A negative correlation was found between mean FAIS scores and age, r (39) ¼ -.380, p ¼ .017. Higher FAIS scores equate to lower QOL indicating lower QOL in families with younger children. Positive correlations between the following variables and number of food allergies were observed: (1) “eating out”, r (39) ¼ 0.326, p ¼ 0.043 (2) “free time”, r (39) ¼ 0.479, p ¼ 0.002, (3) “spouse’s employment”, r (39) ¼ 0.336, p ¼ 0.045, (4) “finances”, r (39) ¼ 0.538, p ¼ 0.001, (5) “special foods”, r (36) ¼ 0.558, p < 0.001, and (6)“other expenses”, r (38) ¼ 0.532, p ¼ 0.001. This indicates that families of children with multiple food allergies eat out less, have less free time, are more likely to live on one income and have additional expenses related to caring for the food allergic child. These data suggest that food allergies negatively impact family QOL in a number of areas. Further study is needed to explore the financial impact of food allergies on family QOL and to identify resources available for this population. Funding Disclosure: None

The Relationship between Early Nutritional Status and Pulmonary Function in Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patients Author(s): A. Gomes1, J. Ziegler2, P. Rothpletz-Puglia2, A. Marcus2; 1Clinical Nutrition/Cystic Fibrosis Center, Connecticut Children’s Med. Ctr., Hartford, CT, 2Graduate Program of Clinical Nutrition, Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ Learning Outcome: Participants will be able identify the impact of early childhood nutritional interventions in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and its impact on pulmonary function in late adolescents. Participants will be able to identify the impact of newborn screening and pulmonary function later in life. Background: Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have increased nutritional needs and progressive loss of lung function. Achieving a weight for age percentile (WAP) and/or a body mass index for age percentile (BMIP) above the 50th percentile has been associated with higher pulmonary function. Methods: A retrospective chart review of 25 patients with CF born between 1989 and 1996 treated at Central Connecticut CF Center (CCCFC) was completed. Nutritional status was measured during the fourth year of life, as nutritional status peaks at this age per the 2011 Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry. Pulmonary status during the seventeenth year of life was measured as forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1%). The relationship between early nutritional status, WAP and BMIP, and mean FEV1% during the seventeenth year of life was analyzed using independent t-tests. Results: Forty-eight percent (n¼12) of participants achieved a WAP at or above the 50th percentile and 44% (n¼11) achieved a BMIP at or above the 50th percentile. There was no difference in mean FEV1% for both nutritional measures. Those with a WAP or BMIP above the 50th percentile had a mean FEV1% above 90%. A statistically significant relationship was found between age at diagnosis and FEV1%. Diagnosis within the first month of life resulted in a higher mean FEV1% compared to diagnosis after the first month of life (p¼0.032). Conclusions: This study underscores the importance of early nutritional interventions for patients with CF and provides support for the importance of newborn screening for CF. Funding Disclosure: None

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JOURNAL OF THE ACADEMY OF NUTRITION AND DIETETICS

September 2014 Suppl 2—Abstracts Volume 114 Number 9