Society for General Microbiology 154th Meeting. Joint Environmental Microbiology Group and the British Mycological Society session, Bath, March 31-April 1 2004

Society for General Microbiology 154th Meeting. Joint Environmental Microbiology Group and the British Mycological Society session, Bath, March 31-April 1 2004

Mycologist, Volume 18, Part 4 November 2004. ©The British Mycological Society Printed in the United Kingdom. Wang, Y-C. (1987). Mycology in Ancient C...

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Mycologist, Volume 18, Part 4 November 2004. ©The British Mycological Society Printed in the United Kingdom.

Wang, Y-C. (1987). Mycology in Ancient China. Mycologist 1: 59-61. Wasson, R. G. (1968). Soma: Divine mushroom of immortality. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich: New York. Wei, D. (1969). Chinese Materia Medica. Kut’ing Book House: Taipei, Taiwan.

Xiao, P. G., Xing, S. T. & Wang, L. W. (1993). Immunological aspects of Chinese medicinal plants as antiageing drugs. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 38: 167-175. Yetts, W. P. (1912). Symbolism in Chinese Art. The China Society. E. J. Brill Co.: Leyden, Holland.

Society for General Microbiology 154th Meeting. Joint Environmental Microbiology Group and the British Mycological Society session, Bath, March 31-April 1 2004 The joint SGM/BMS session at the University of Bath was an ideal occasion to bring together expertise from mycology, microbiology, and geoscience. Two excellent presentations by Henry Ehrlich and Geoffrey Gadd opened the session, and conveyed a sense of conceptual synergy that remained for the two days. An extraordinarily high quality of symposia by international leaders in the fields of fungal activity, biomineralisation, bioremediation, and other disciplines was presented, supported by a wide variety of posters and informal discussions in a relaxed environment. Several presentations that included animated modelling of fungal growth and nutrient transport mechanisms illustrated the potential of applying advanced mathematics to biological systems. The University of Bath was a large enough venue to

provide all the necessary amenities but yet small enough to contribute to an overall convivial atmosphere, and the isolated setting of the campus on top of a hill overlooking the UNESCO World Heritage city of Bath lent a creative atmosphere to the meeting. Delegates were well catered for, and the "Choices" breakfasts provided energy for the morning sessions. Ample tea/coffee breaks provided both the opportunity to replenish energy and to peruse the many multi-disciplinal posters that were on display. The evening program included frequenting several of the excellent local restaurants and pubs and also featured a society reception at the Roman Baths and conference dinner on the University campus, both of which were well attended. Deirdre Gleeson and James Baldini

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