The Anatomy of the Head and Neck

The Anatomy of the Head and Neck

BOOK REVIEWS Yet, we all know the enormous clinical value of perimetry and cannot practice efficiently without it. Anything that stimulates us to do b...

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BOOK REVIEWS Yet, we all know the enormous clinical value of perimetry and cannot practice efficiently without it. Anything that stimulates us to do better perimetry and get some fun out of it in addition is a great help. Dr. H a r r i n g ­ ton's book will go a long way toward stimu­ lating our interest. The book is beautifully printed and illus­ trated, as already mentioned. It covers the entire field of perimetry, better I think than any book yet published on the subject. Tt should be in the hands of every neurosurgeon, neurologist, and ophthalmologist. Derrick Vail.

T R A N S A C T I O N S OF T H E P A C I F I C COAST O T O O P H T H A L M O L O G I C A L SOCIETY, 1956.

Vol.

ume 37. Edited by O r w y n H . Ellis, M.D. Los Angeles, California, Morrissey Bros., printers, 1956. 369 pages. Price: Not listed. The Pacific Coast Oto-Ophthalmological Society, now consisting of 660 active mem­ bers, was launched in 1911 when E r n s t Fuchs delivered the Lane Lectures in San Francisco. The annual five-day meeting fol­ lows a pattern similar to that of the Ameri­ can Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology (than which no better model could be chosen) with a superlative scien­ tific program, adorned by a distinguished guest lecturer, motion pictures, and instruc­ tion courses. Outstanding in this beautiful volume are the presidential address by Lester T. Jones on epiphora; the differential diag­ nosis and management of proptosis by Al­ bert C. Furstenberg, guest lecturer; experi­ mental scleral surgery of the monkey by Asbury and V a u g h a n ; differential diagnosis of superficial keratitis by Thygeson and K i m u r a ; vascular lesions of the visual path­ ways by Alexander; lid injuries by Singer; and pediatric anesthesia by Stringham. As the by-laws of the society permit publication of papers in other journals, several of the contributions have already appeared in T H E JOURNAL.

643

To paraphrase Bishop Berkeley, westward the course of ophthalmology takes its way, as this fine tome amply testifies. It is very much worth reading and having. James E. Lebensohn.

THE

A N A T O M Y OF T H E H E A D A N D

NECK.

By Barry J. Anson, M.D. Philadelphia, W . B. Saunders Company, 1956. 94 pages, 92 plates, index. Price: $6.50. The author is the professor of anatomy, Northwestern University Medical School, whose many contributions to the field of otology are particularly well known. This work consists of an atlas of gross anatomy, the dissections pictured being serially pre­ sented, and is intended to meet the special needs of the doctor in dental practice. H o w ­ ever, all physicians whose professional in­ terests lie above the shoulders will find it of value. The line drawings, reproduced for the most part in black and white, are clearly executed, and the parts are adequately and clearly labelled. The drawings of the eye and orbit are standard, although not to scale and obviously are not designed to be of mi­ nute interest to the ophthalmologist. It is a handsome and handy (thin) book bound in a spiral filler cloth cover, thus per­ mitting one to expose the plates on the flat, a most useful device. It represents defini­ tive and meticulous work by an expert. Derrick Vail.

A N A T L A S ILLUSTRATING T H E T O P O G R A P H I ­ CAL A N A T O M Y OF T H E H E A D , N E C K , AND

T R U N K . By the late Johnson Symington. Springfield, Illinois, Charles C Thomas, 1956. Thirty-four plates on cards 19 by 12 inches. Price: $21.00. The first series of the Atlas appeared in September, 1917, and consisted of 25 plates and two reconstructions. A few months later a second series was published with the addi­ tion of five plates and two reconstructions. It was very popular for years. In 1954 the