The prevention and treatment of individual attacks of angina pectoris (angina of effort)

The prevention and treatment of individual attacks of angina pectoris (angina of effort)

549 ABSTRACTS in regard to the T-wave within from twenty-four to seventy-two hours if orally a&ministered and immediately if given intravenously. Th...

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549

ABSTRACTS

in regard to the T-wave within from twenty-four to seventy-two hours if orally a&ministered and immediately if given intravenously. These changes varied from The duration of the effect mild flattening to sharp inversion of the T-waves. varied from three to six days on oral administration and three hours on intraChanges in the QRfi ant1 P-R inter\-als art’ pr~umably venous administration. effects produced by intoxicating doses.

Gold, Harry, Digitalis

and Klumpp, and Diphtheria

On the Alleged Antagonism Margaret M.: Toxin. Am. J. M. SC. 185: 509, 1933.

Between

Results of this study show that digitalis does not afford any protection against, It is probable that the same is true poisoning by diphtheria toxin in the eat. in man. It was also observed that very large iloscs of digitalis may hasten the death of animals poisoned by diphtheria toxin. Reference also is made to the fact that the routine use of tligitalis in pneumonia does not lcsxen the mortality from that disease.

The Prevention and Treatment of IndividEvans, William, and Hoyle, Clifford: ual Attacks of Angina Pectoris (Angina of Effort). Quart. J. Med. 3: 105, 1934. A series of 1% patients with angina poctoris was observed over a period of three years with special reference to the comparative value of vasodilator drugs for the immediate treatment and prevention of attacks. The comparative results show that glyceryl trinitrate in tablet form when absorbed from the mouth is by far the most effective agent for relieving attacks and for their immediate prevention. Eighty-six per cent of the patients obtained great relief and a furthcr 11 per cent moderate relief. Other preparatrons of glyceryl trinitrate and ot,her remedies tried did not give such good results. Glyccryl trinitrate tablets shouid deservedly hold the first place in routine treatment. This is more advisable because they rarely cause objectionable symptoms; they are easy to store and carry so that they are always ‘available for immediate use, and they are cheap. The only practical disadvantage is that t,hey deteriorate in strength, especially when exposed to air and heat, so that they should be used preferably within two months of manufacture. Amy1 nitrite proved to be disappointing for the relief of attacks, and it can he recommended only for those rare cases where glyccryl nitrate fails to relieve. It has the further Ilisndvantage of heing useless for the prevention of attacks. The use of glyceryl trinitrate tablets immediately before expected angina1 attacks is a safe means of preventing pain and should bc used far more widely in routine treatment than it is at present. In our series 84.5 per cent patients obtained great benefit and a further 12.5 per cent moderate benefit by using the drug in this way. This is a greater measure of improvement than was found from any of the remedies tried in tbis investigation of continuous treatment. Most patients preferred to take the drug at their own discretion, and this method of administration proved more effective than when it was taken at short fixed intervals, except for those patients who could not predict attacks with certainty. NO harmful effects were met from such treatment; though patients used the drug freely for upwards of two to three years, and often this enabled them to take more physical exertion and lcad a fuller life than had previously been possible. C+ilchris& Med. The tested

A. Rae: 2: 483, response by the

The Action

of Atropine

in Complete

Heart Block.

Quart.

.I’.

1933. of ten individuals suffering intravenous administration

of

from complete heart-block has 1/5o gr. of atropine sulphate.

been Re-