The Travel and Tropical Medicine Manual

The Travel and Tropical Medicine Manual

Mayo Clin Proc, September 1987, Vol 62 which ring true in 1987 as clearly as when they were first articulated. The release of the book is most timely...

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Mayo Clin Proc, September 1987, Vol 62

which ring true in 1987 as clearly as when they were first articulated. The release of the book is most timely because it coincides with the centen­ nial celebration of The American Physiological Society. Thus, it is most appropriate reading for all physiologists and those interested in the origins of the scientific basis of medicine. Franklyn G. Knox, M.D., Ph.D. Department of Physiology and Biophysics

Textbook of Pediatric Infectious D i s e a s e s , 2nd ed (in 2 vols), edited by Ralph D. Feigin and James D. Cherry, 2,548 pp, with illus, $195, Philadelphia, W. B. Saunders Company, 1987 First published in 1981, this textbook filled the need for an authoritative reference source for those who care for infants and children with infectious diseases. The second edition (in two volumes) primarily updates the first, paralleling the basic format. The first section offers a dis­ cussion of host-parasite relationships and the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. Chapters fol­ low on infections of specific organ systems and on infections with specific microorganisms. In addition to comprehensive coverage of pe­ diatric infectious diseases by using the affected organ system or pathogen format, sections are devoted to subjects that are of special interest to pediatricians, family practitioners, and infec­ tious disease specialists who deal with children of all ages. The following topics are examples of the material included: normal indigenous flora of the host, active and passive immunizations, ap­ proach to the patient with fever without localiz­ ing signs and fever of unknown origin, control of infections in the day-care center, control of infections in a pediatric hospital, intrauterine infections, perinatal bacterial infections, endotoxic shock, toxic shock syndrome, infections due to bites (animal and human), optimal use of the clinical microbiology laboratory, and rapid diag­ nostic techniques. The new edition encompasses major advances in research in pediatric infectious diseases and up-to-date management strategies for effective practice. The 48 chapters in the two volumes were written by 164 authors, an outstanding team of authorities in the field of microbiology and in­

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fectious diseases. The text contributions are ac­ companied by useful photographs, tables, dia­ grams, and exhaustive references. Clinical disorders—acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), Lyme disease, Kawasaki dis­ ease, and others—about which only limited infor­ mation was available for publication in the first edition, are covered in detail in the new edition. The authors admit that, "In many of these areas, new information continues to accrue so rapidly that material becomes dated before it can appear in a text of this magnitude. In several instances, new diseases have been described (and have been incorporated) that were not included in the orig­ inal outline for this edition." Obviously, an effort has been made to present material that is as current as possible. These volumes should be a welcome addition to medical libraries of all sizes. Many physicians who are responsible for the care of children will benefit from and enjoy using them. Kathleen H. Rhodes, M.D. Department of Pediatrics

The Travel and Tropical Medicine Manual, edited by Elaine C. Jong, 323 pp, with illus, $19.95, Philadelphia, W. B. Saunders Com­ pany, 1987 This small book is replete with information physicians need for counseling their patients who travel. As editor, Dr. Jong has smoothly inte­ grated the material from the contributing authors to avoid redundancy and jarring style changes between chapters. The book is divided into sections that review the topics of the traveling patient, fever, diarrhea, skin lesions, sexually transmitted diseases, and worms. The first section alone is well worth the price of the book. In this section, Dr. Jong and her contributors provide information on how to advise travelers on immunizations needed, prevention of malaria and diarrhea, what to take along, jet lag, and how to get emergency medical care abroad; special advice for infants and preg­ nant women is also offered. The information is clear, concise, and current. The rest of the book is a minitext on the dis­ eases of travelers. The section on fever covers the

Mayo Clin Proc, September 1987, Vol 62

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urology. The development of magnetic resonance imaging, lasers, flow cytometry, quantitative cytology, and cystometry is discussed. For each of these still-evolving methods, the potential use­ fulness and limitations are outlined. The third section discusses the currently recom­ mended diagnostic steps in approaching renal masses and renal injuries. Emphasis is placed on the strengths and weaknesses of plain film roentgenography, excretory urography, ultrasonography, angiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging and the relative cost of each of these procedures. Additional topics include scrotal and prostatic ultrasonography, evaluation of the fetus with hydronephrosis, and the current status of laboratory cytotoxic chemosensitivity testing. The final section of the book covers the appli­ cation of new technologies to patient manage­ ment. The nine chapters review sperm penetra­ tion assays in the evaluation of infertility, monoclonal antibody production and uses, photosensitivity of superficial bladder cancers, androgen receptors in prostatic cancer, fine-needle as­ piration of the prostate, microsurgery, prosthetics for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and uri­ Conrad J. Wilkowske, M.D. nary incontinence, and nutrition. Division of Infectious Diseases This book should not be considered as the and Internal Medicine definitive source for any of the aforementioned topics but rather a starting point on which to build an understanding of the current technologic advances in urology. Each chapter includes a good bibliography for further independent study. N e w Techniques in Urology, edited by Ralph As many of the authors point out, these are new W. deVere White and John M. Palmer, 431 pp, technologies, the true clinical relevance of which with illus, $65, Mount Kisco, New York, Futura remains to be verified by larger clinical trials. Publishing Company, 1987

diagnosis and treatment of malaria, viral hepa­ titis, and tuberculosis as well as less common infections. Even though it is concise, it seems to cover the important details of these diseases. The section on diarrhea begins with a practical approach to travelers with diarrhea. Several methods of obtaining a stool specimen are even described. The dermatology material encompasses almost 50 pages, covering lesions as diverse as lice and Hansen's disease (leprosy). The chapter on Hansen's disease contains more information than the major textbooks of medicine or infec­ tious diseases. The appendix has lists of resources for health­ care providers and for travelers and a partial list of travel clinics in the United States and Canada. I urge all those who provide medical travel advice, immunizations for travelers, or treatment for ill travelers to purchase this book. Physicians who travel may want a copy for their personal use. This manual, along with the Public Health Services' "Health Information for International Travel (1987)," will answer almost any question that may arise.

The current practice of urology is in a state of evolution, with old techniques giving way to the new. The most dramatic changes have taken place in the realm of management of stones and manipulation of the upper urinary tract. The editors devote the first quarter of their book to the invasive and noninvasive techniques for stone disease and access of the upper urinary tract. They also include information about the theory and implementation of the technology behind the advances (for example, the extracorporeal shock-wave lithotriptor). The second section describes the technologic advances in instrumentation in other medical fields that have had an effect on the practice of

Donald E. Engen, M.D. Department of Urology

Postoperative Complications of Extracranial Neurological Surgery, edited by Nor­ man H. Horwitz and Hugo V. Rizzoli, 387 pp, with illus, $65, Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins, 1987 This volume is a superb complement to a previous book by the same authors, in which complica­ tions of intracranial surgical procedures were reviewed. Both of these books will be standard reference sources for the psychologically unap-